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Is there any difference between these two queries?

Query 1:

select a.idclientecrm from clientescrmporlistadeclientescrm a
inner join clientescrmporlistadeclientescrm b on (a.idclientecrm=b.idclientecrm and            a.idlistadeclientescrm = 58)
inner join tareas c on b.idclientecrm = c.idclientecrm
where b.idlistadeclientescrm = 70

Query 2:

select a.idclientecrm from clientescrmporlistadeclientescrm a
inner join clientescrmporlistadeclientescrm b on (a.idclientecrm=b.idclientecrm and   a.idlistadeclientescrm = 58)
where b.idlistadeclientescrm = 70

I know the first one has the extra inner join on the "tareas" table, but I didn't know it would give me a different result. Can anyone tell me why?

Edit:

I'm trying to join the result of this query:

select a.idclientecrm from clientescrmporlistadeclientescrm a
inner join clientescrmporlistadeclientescrm b on (a.idclientecrm=b.idclientecrm and   a.idlistadeclientescrm = 58)
where b.idlistadeclientescrm = 70

with another table called "tareas", from which I only need the max date. There can be more than one date for each idclientecrm. The "tareas" table has the idclientecrm field to join tables.

Hope it's understandable.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Because the additional inner join is an additional constraint. It will only return records where b and c's idclientecrm matches. –  Robert Harvey May 13 '13 at 19:53
    
Because the point of an inner join is to filter rows based on a relation between two tables. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Join_(SQL)#Inner_join –  Esoteric Screen Name May 13 '13 at 19:54
1  
So ... you're asking why, when you use two different queries on the same data, you get different results? –  scottb May 13 '13 at 19:54
    
@scottb: It's not an entirely unreasonable question; different queries can have the same result set. –  Robert Harvey May 13 '13 at 19:55
1  
People downvoting questions because they are ''novice'' and may sound dumb actually erode the very reason S.O was created. I might be wrong though –  Nicholas Kyriakides May 13 '13 at 20:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The only way that the queries would have the same results is if the tareas join matched every record (in the preceding from..inner join set) exactly once.

If the first query results in more rows, then the tareas contains duplicates records per the join predicate (i.e. it has duplicate idclientecrm values). This why the records must be matched exactly once for the same result set. (If this was meant to be a 1-1 relationship then some constraints were not setup correctly .. whoops!)

Consider this simple inner join example showing the outcome with different multiplicities:

A <- { 1, 2, 4 }
B <- { 1, 2(#1), 2(#2), 3 }

A join B => { 1, 2(#1), 2(#2) }

Reason for result:

  • A.1 match B.1 - this is the only record that matched exactly once
  • A.2 match B.2(#1)
  • A.2 match B.2(#2)
  • A.4 no match
  • B.3 no match

I think that this excerpt from Wikipedia explains the concept well:

The result of the join can be defined as the outcome of first taking the Cartesian product (or Cross join) of all records in the tables (combining every record in table A with every record in table B)—then return all records which satisfy the join predicate.

(This why a CROSS JOIN with a WHERE can return the same results as an INNER JOIN - ick, though!)

share|improve this answer
    
excellent example. Helped me understand very clearly the difference. Thnx –  Pietro May 13 '13 at 20:30
    
@Pietro You're welcome :D –  user2246674 May 13 '13 at 21:20

An inner join means: for each row in the left-hand table, return all matching rows in the right-hand table. Do not return rows without a match in the right-hand table.

So joining a new table can both reduce and increase the number of rows returned:

  • Reduce because the new join filters out rows without a match
  • Increase because the new join can add more than one row per row in the left-hand table. That will occur if more than one right-hand row matches a left-hand one.
share|improve this answer
    
It could raise and lower leaving a net-gain of unknown :D –  user2246674 May 13 '13 at 20:01

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