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I'm trying to become more facile with pointers. So, for fun, I took the following C++ function that partitions a linked list around a value

void partitionList(lnode<int> *& head, int val) {
    lnode<int> * front = nullptr;
    lnode<int> * back = nullptr;
    lnode<int> * curr = head;

    while (curr) {
        lnode<int> * next = curr->next;
        if (curr->data < val) {
            curr->next = front;
            front = curr;
        } else {
            curr->next = back;
            back = curr;
        }
        curr = next;
    }

    curr = front;
    while (curr->next) {
        curr = curr->next;
    }
    curr->next = back;
    head = front;
}

and I tried to change it to take a C-style double pointer instead. I did a mindless find-replace, which didn't work. Looking into it, I found the source of my problem, but I still don't really understand what's going on...

void partitionList(lnode<int> ** head, int val) {
    lnode<int> * front = nullptr;
    lnode<int> * back = nullptr;
    lnode<int> ** curr = head;

    while (*curr) {
        lnode<int> * entry = *curr;

        std::cout << (*curr)->data << std::endl; // On second loop, prints 2
        std::cout << entry->data << std::endl; // On second loop, prints 2

        lnode<int> * next = entry->next; // This assignment does something

        std::cout << entry->data << std::endl; // On second loop, prints 2
        std::cout << (*curr)->data << std::endl; // On second loop, prints 3!

        if ((*curr)->data < val) {
            (*curr)->next = front;
            front = *curr;
        } else {
            (*curr)->next = back;
            back = *curr;
        }
        curr = &next;
    }

    *curr = front;
    while ((*curr)->next) {
        (*curr) = (*curr)->next;
    }
    (*curr)->next = back;
    head = &front;
}

int main() {
    lnode<int> * tail = new lnode<int>(8, nullptr);
    lnode<int> * seven = new lnode<int>(7, tail);
    lnode<int> * six = new lnode<int>(6, seven);
    lnode<int> * five = new lnode<int>(5, six);
    lnode<int> * four = new lnode<int>(4, five);
    lnode<int> * three = new lnode<int>(3, four);
    lnode<int> * two = new lnode<int>(2, three);
    lnode<int> * head = new lnode<int>(1, two);

    partitionList(&head, 6);
}

On the first loop, all four of the debug print lines near the top of the function's while loop print "1". However, on the second loop, they print "2", "2", "2", "3"?

Can anyone explain what's going on? What's the right way to use a double pointer instead of a reference to a pointer?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
void partitionList(lnode<int> *& head, int val) {
    ...
    head = front; // <= head is modified
}

but here is not

void partitionList(lnode<int> ** head, int val) {
    ...
    head = &front; // try it with *head = front
}

and if you want a quick replace for this

void partitionList(lnode<int> *& head, int val) {
   ...
   lnode<int> * curr = head;

just write this:

void partitionList(lnode<int> ** head, int val) {
    ...
    lnode<int> * curr = *head;

Why did you modify *cur to **cur?

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense, but I still don't understand what's going on with the print output. Why does doing this lnode<int> * next = entry->next; change the value of (*curr)->data and not entry->data? –  piyo May 14 '13 at 15:49
    
Because of this: curr = &next; here "curr" variable got the address of local variable "next" and next = entry->next; will modify curr. So replace curr = &next; with *curr = next; –  Industrial-antidepressant May 14 '13 at 16:16
    
Ah, now I think I see. I get it, I get it. Thanks! –  piyo May 17 '13 at 14:32

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