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I was reading the re-introduction to JavaScript on MDN website and came across this in the Custom Objects section:

function personFullName() {
    return this.first + ' ' + this.last;
}
function personFullNameReversed() {
    return this.last + ', ' + this.first;
}
function Person(first, last) {
    this.first = first;
    this.last = last;
    this.fullName = personFullName;
    this.fullNameReversed = personFullNameReversed;
}

It says on the MDN website that you can make a reference to the personFullName() and personFullNameReversed() functions from within the Person constructor simply by typing in their names and assigning them as values to the two variables stated in the code above (this.fullName and this.fullNameReversed). This is all very clear to me, but my question is why are the brackets next to personFullName and personFullNameReversed omitted? Shouldn't it say:

this.fullName = personFullName();
this.fullNameReversed = personFullNameReversed();?

The way that it was presented in the example from the MDN website I feel like those fullName and fullNameReversed properties from the Person constructor are pointing to some already declared global variables instead of functions declared outside of the Person constructor.

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you add the brackets, you'll call the functions and assign their return values to this.fullName and this.fullNameReversed.

The code is referring to the functions, not calling them.

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So if I added the brackets this.first from the personFullName() function would actually point to a global variable first and not to the property first of the Person constructor, and thus would return the result of using a global variable as opposed to a local variable from the Person constructor? –  SineLaboreNihil May 13 '13 at 21:22
1  
@SineLaboreNihil: Yes, correct. If you added the brackets, this.fullName would not be a function at all, it would be the string "undefined undefined". The line this.fullName = personFullName() (with the brackets) would call personFullName as that line of code was executed. That call would build a string from the undefined first and last global variables. See it here: jsfiddle.net/h9N6Y –  RichieHindle May 13 '13 at 21:31
    
Thank you very much for clearing this up for me. I really appreciate it. :) –  SineLaboreNihil May 13 '13 at 21:35
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It's assigning the function, not the result of the function. It's equivalent to:

function Person(first, last) {
    this.first = first;
    this.last = last;
    this.fullName = function () {
        return this.first + ' ' + this.last;
    };
    this.fullNameReversed = function () {
        return this.last + ', ' + this.first;
    };
}

so now you can do:

var jack = new Person('Jack', 'Smith');
console.log(jack.fullName()); // Jack Smith
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