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Not sure how to phrase this question, but I want an aggregate query applied to multiple rows. Hopefully an example should make this easier. Assuming I have the following data:

  player  | year | games
-------------------------
ausmubr01 | 2006 | 139
ausmubr01 | 2007 | 117
bondsba01 | 2006 | 130
bondsba01 | 2007 | 126
stairma01 | 2006 | 26
stairma01 | 2006 | 77
stairma01 | 2006 | 14
stairma01 | 2007 | 125

And for each player in each year, I want to calculate their "career year", i.e. the number of years they've been playing:

  player  | year | games | cyear
 --------------------------------
ausmubr01 | 2006 | 139   |  1
ausmubr01 | 2007 | 117   |  2
bondsba01 | 2006 | 130   |  1
bondsba01 | 2007 | 126   |  2
stairma01 | 2006 | 26    |  1
stairma01 | 2006 | 77    |  2
stairma01 | 2006 | 14    |  3
stairma01 | 2007 | 125   |  4

It would be natural to express this transformation as SELECT player, year, games, year - min(year) + 1 as cyear FROM baseball GROUP by player but because of the rules for aggregate queries the expression is only evaluated once for each group:

  player  | year | games | cyear
 --------------------------------
ausmubr01 | 2006 | 139   |  1
bondsba01 | 2006 | 130   |  1
stairma01 | 2006 | 26    |  1

How can I overcome this problem in general (i.e. not just for this case but whenever I want to perform an arithmetic operation combining an existing column and a single per-group number computed with an aggregate function)?

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1  
Please specify the RDBMS that you are targeting by adding the appropriate tag (Oracle, SQL Server, MySQL, etc.). There may be answers that take advantage of language or product features that are not universally supported. Also, by tagging it with a specific RDBMS, your question may receive attention from people better suited to answer it –  bluefeet May 13 '13 at 21:42
1  
@bluefeet I'm interested in answers that apply broadly, not to a specific RDBMS. –  hadley May 13 '13 at 21:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use ROW_NUMBER for the career-year:

SELECT player, year, games,
       cyear = ROW_NUMBER () OVER (PARTITION BY player ORDER BY year),
       gamesPerMax = 1.0 * games / MAX(games) OVER (PARTITION BY player)
FROM dbo.TableName

Demo

Have a look at the powerful OVER clause.

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Thanks - that helps for this specific case, but not in general (e.g. games / max(games) –  hadley May 13 '13 at 21:49
    
@hadley: Then use games / MAX(games)OVER..., edited my answer. –  Tim Schmelter May 13 '13 at 21:58
    
That's useful - it's not supported by the RDMS I'm using for prototyping (sqlite) but I see postgresql also supports it. –  hadley May 13 '13 at 22:04
    
And the key thing is that that's called a window function. –  hadley May 14 '13 at 13:42

One straightforward method is to compute each player's starting year as an aggregate query, and join the data with the original. These kinds of "sequence based" queries are usually tricky to express in a set based language :(

WITH tmp as (
  select player, min(year) as minyear 
  from table 
  group by player
);

select t.*, t.year - t.minyear + 1 as cyear
from table as t, tmp
where t.player = tmp.player;
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If you don't have WITH or OVER, then ... get a real database. Failing that, you can do it with a subquery:

SELECT t.*, t.year - subtable.minyear + 1 AS cyear
FROM table AS t
JOIN (
  select player, min(year) as minyear 
  from table 
  group by player
) AS SubTable
ON T.player = SubTable.player
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Just use multiple group by... and sum on the desired field

GROUP BY player, year
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