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I have quite generic webservice, which responds with many standard http statuses. However, it returns different types according to these statuses. This is completely proper REST implementation: I GET a Person entity with status 200 (OK), but when error occures, for example auth problem, I receive the 403 (Forbidden) with list of error messages (stating that token expired or my account is inactive, etc).

Unfortunately, using RestSharp I can only "bind" to one type of data which I should expect:

  client.ExecuteAsync<Person>(request, (response) =>
  {
        callback(response.Data);
  });

How should I capture the error messages, when status is different than 200? Of course, I could do this by hand and deserialize the response content myself, but I think there should be some cleaner, better way to accomplish that. I'd like to use something like this:

  client.ExecuteAsync<Person, ErrorList>(request, (response) =>
  {
        if (response.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK)
        {
            Callback(response.Data);
        }
        else if (response.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK)
        {
            ErrorCallback(response.Errors);
        }
  });
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The way that I've always handled it is to write a post processor for restsharp response. something like this,

public class Response<T>
{
  public T Data {get;set;}
  public List<Error> Errors {get;set;}
}

public static Response<T> GetResponse<T>(this IRestResponse restResponse)
{
        var response = new Response<T>();

        if (response.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK)
        {
            response.Data = JsonConvert.DeserilizeObject<T>(restResponse.Data)
        }

        response.Errors =JsonConvert.DeserilizeObject<List<Error>>(restResponse.Error)

        return response;
}

and you can use it like this,

var response = client.Execute(request).GetResponse<T>();
share|improve this answer
    
So basically it is deserialization by hand. However, extension method is a good choice, I haven't thought about it. –  jacek May 16 '13 at 21:32
    
So this assumes that your API returns JSON in the form of Data and Errors array? –  The Muffin Man Aug 6 '14 at 19:45

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