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I have a parent table containing the following columns:
- PARENT_ID: UUID
- EVENT_DATE: TIMESTAMP
- DATA_COLUMN1: VARCHAR2(255)
- DATA_COLUMN2: VARCHAR2(255)

The table is range partitioned by EVENT_DATE. Data is only retained for a month and the last partition is dropped on a daily basis.

Following my understanding, using a global index for PK would result in sub-standard performance when dropping a partition. This means that the PK of this table has to be based on both PARENT_ID + EVENT_DATE in order to create a local index.

I have a second table that is the child of the first (via one-to-many relationship). It has the following columns:
- CHILD_ID: UUID
- PARENT_ID: UUID - FK into parent table
- DATA_COLUMN3: VARCHAR2(255)
- DATA_COLUMN4: VARCHAR2(255)

To partition the child table, I decided to use reference partitioning. One of its big advantages: it removes the need to duplicate the partition key in the child table. However, based on my reasoning, the only way to achieve this is through global indexes. Here is my train of thought:

  1. For the unique index of the parent table to be local, the PK must include the partition key, e.g. EVENT_DATE.
  2. A foreign key constrain cannot reference only part of the PK. Thus the child table must include both PARENT_ID and EVENT_DATE columns.

What's more, I also read that "When using reference partitioning, most child table indexes should be defined as global, unless there is a compelling reason for a given index to be defined as local." (http://www.nocoug.org/download/2010-05/Zitelli-Reference_Partitioning_NoCOUG.pdf).

Am I missing something or is there no way to use reference partitioning without having global indexes or duplicating data?
An explanation on how reference partitioning works with local/global indexes will be much appreciated!

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You understand correctly. if you want to create a reference partition you need to define a valid FK. in your case - both parent_id and event_id needs to be present in the child table.

Ref partitions are for cases when you want to partition a table according to a column not in the PK those not in the child table. this is not your case - you can apply range partition on both tables and gain max pruning.

The event_date in the child table is not redundant - it's required by the model - you need data_columns 3/4 in the child table for each instance of parent_id + event_date.

Regarding the local indexes on a child table in a ref partitioned table - my logic say exactly the opposite. if i have a ref partition i'm aiming at max pruning which means that i want as less partitions as possible to be accessed in each query. in this case i would want local indexes and not global.

You said "using a global index for PK would result in sub-standard performance when dropping a partition". when you drop a partition from the table all global indexes will be invalidated and you will have to rebuild them. this is the only performance impact regarding DDL changes. PK on a partitioned table must be global so you don't have a choice here any way.

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Though above answer has been answered but on you thought: 'A foreign key constrain cannot reference only part of the PK. Thus the child table must include both PARENT_ID and EVENT_DATE columns.'

I believe FK can refer to part of PK if your attribute has been defined with Unique constraint & I see that possible in your example.

Example:

Table A ( orderid, orderdate, custid) PF -> OrderID, OrderDate

Table B(OrderID, ItemID)

In table B, orderID can be FK if OrderID is defined as Unique in Table A.

I hope this helps.

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