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I have been fiddling round with this code for ages and cannot figure out how to make it pass the doctests. the output is always 1000 less than the corrects answer. is there a simple way to change this code so that it gives the desired output ?? my code is:

def sum_numbers_in_file(filename):
    """
    Return the sum of the numbers in the given file (which only contains
    integers separated by whitespace).
    >>> sum_numbers_in_file("numb.txt")
    19138
    """
    f = open(filename)
    m = f.readline()
    n = sum([sum([int(x) for x in line.split()]) for line in f])
    f.close()
    return n

the values in the file are:

1000 
15000 
2000 
1138
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1  
what have you tried yourself? –  Taryn East May 14 '13 at 1:41
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3 Answers

The culprit is:

m = f.readline() 

when you are doing f.readline(), it is losing the 1000, which is not being considered in the list comprehension. Hence the error.

This should work:

def sum_numbers_in_file(filename):
    """
    Return the sum of the numbers in the given file (which only contains
    integers separated by whitespace).
    >>> sum_numbers_in_file("numb.txt")
    19138
    """
    f = open(filename, 'r+')
    m = f.readlines()
    n = sum([sum([int(x) for x in line.split()]) for line in m])
    f.close()
    return n
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So why can't you just get rid of the m = f.readline()? –  cHao May 14 '13 at 2:09
    
well.. i changed it to readlines() now. Please see the difference between the original code, and mine –  karthikr May 14 '13 at 2:16
    
That said, the approach of "just getting rid of the readline call" is simpler and cleaner. Also, the square brackets are unnecessary for the calls to sum, and it would be better to manage the file using a with block. –  Karl Knechtel May 14 '13 at 3:32
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You pull out the first line and store it in m. Then never use it.

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This should be a comment. Please put some effort into your answer. –  Droogans May 14 '13 at 1:43
    
Hi @Droogans - This is a precise summary of the problem in the OP's code. –  Taryn East May 14 '13 at 5:57
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You could use two for-loops in one generator expression:

def sum_numbers_in_file(filename):
    """
    Return the sum of the numbers in the given file (which only contains
    integers separated by whitespace).
    >>> sum_numbers_in_file("numb.txt")
    19138
    """
    with open(filename) as f:
        return sum(int(x)
                   for line in f
                   for x in line.split())

The generator expression above is equivalent to

    result = []
    for line in f:
        for x in line.split():
            result.append(int(x))
    return sum(result)
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Is this technically a multi-line comprehension? –  Droogans May 14 '13 at 1:47
    
It's a common yellow flag for Python style. Which you may or may not care about, I'm just letting you know...google-styleguide.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/… –  Droogans May 14 '13 at 1:56
1  
@Droogans: Thank you for pointing that out. I don't think what I wrote above is all that complicated, do you? In fact I've seen really elegant Python programmers (like Peter Norvig, the Director of Google Research) use long multiline generator expressions to solve problems. I find it hard to believe the Google style guide is opposed to this usage. –  unutbu May 14 '13 at 3:01
    
The issue with the usage is that some people find the order of the elements unintuitive - however, it is easy to explain how to think about it ("the clauses go in the same order in the list comprehension that they would in the equivalent looping code"), and it doesn't matter anyway for sum. Note also that the result is implicitly "flattened"; I think some people feel this is "too implicit" or something. –  Karl Knechtel May 14 '13 at 3:34
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