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I have the following table containing path info:

I need to replace the DIRECTORY_NAME value in the PATH field with the NEW_DIR_NAME value recursively.

sample table:

PATH                                              |DIRECTORY_NAME                   |NEW_DIR_NAME
...............................................................................................................
\folder1\folder2\2a                          | folder2\2a                                  | folder2/2a
\folder1\folder2\2a\folder3              | folder3                                       | folder3
\folder1\folder2\2a\folder4              | folder4                                       | folder4
\folder1\folder2\2a\folder4\2a\2b    | 2a\2b                                         | 2a/2b
...............................................................................................................
The result would look like this: * changes are in bold

NEW_PATH
...............................................................................................................
\folder1\ folder2/2a
\folder1\ folder2/2a\folder3
\folder1\ folder2/2a\folder4
\folder1\ folder2/2a\folder4\ 2a/2b
...............................................................................................................

database is Oracle.

using the select replace(PATH, DIRECTORY_NAME, NEW_DIR_NAME) function will yield the folowing (not the solution):

\folder1\ folder2/2a
\folder1\folder2\2a\ folder3
\folder1\folder2\2a\ folder4
\folder1\folder2\2a\folder4\ 2a/2b

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Does it matter what order the replaces are done? i.e. what if a string has the value \folder1\folder3\2a\2b and your second row (reference=folder3) had replace_with=folder2? The answer may be ambiguous. –  Jeffrey Kemp May 14 '13 at 3:47
    
yes, the replaces are done in order. "STRING" is sorted. –  Robbie Vago May 14 '13 at 5:21
    
I'm sorry, now that makes even less sense. "STRING" is the input data, what does sorting it do? –  Jeffrey Kemp May 14 '13 at 5:39
    
Maybe if I provide some context to the issue it may be clearer. "STRING" is a directory path. So when sorted, the field shows directories and sub-directories. Unfortunately some directories have been named using "/". for example "folder2/2a" is one directory not two. By reversing the "/" the end users can easily see where each directory is. –  Robbie Vago May 14 '13 at 6:10
    
I've updated the original question to use more valid field names. –  Robbie Vago May 14 '13 at 6:19

2 Answers 2

Your problem is your data. Your table posits a one-to-one relationship between PATH and DIRECTORY_NAME, and hence with NEW_DIR_NAME. But according to your required output this is clearly not so. The DIRECTORY_NAME appears in multiple values of PATH.

So what you need to do is run the replace() statement for every combination where DIRECTORY_NAME != NEW_DIR_NAME

for lrec in ( select DIRECTORY_NAME, NEW_DIR_NAME 
              from your_table 
              where DIRECTORY_NAME != NEW_DIR_NAME )
loop

    update your_table
    set  path = replace(PATH, lrec.DIRECTORY_NAME, lrec.NEW_DIR_NAME)
    ;
end loop;

This is not a particularly efficient approach but presumably this is a one-off exercise.

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Please tell me your field name isn't really STRING. Anyways, here's the code you need, based on the supplied field names.

SELECT REPLACE(STRING,REFERENCE,REPLACE_WITH)
share|improve this answer
    
No the field name isnt really string ;) Unfortuately, the replace function only replaces the current record. I need it to grab the reference field and replace it in every record where the reference is found. –  Robbie Vago May 14 '13 at 2:43

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