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I am writing the small C++ message-based communication framework with using of the Reactor pattern. The problem which I have met is the serialization of the application (user-defined) messages. To prevent API from redudant information I make an assumption about the serialization function. There is an Archive class which holds the serialized form of the message, however it is the template, so the user could choose the binary form of its. The assumption is that for each message there will be only one serialization function available (defined), so the type deduction of the binary type could be cleary deduced from the function signature. Let's see the code:

template <typename T> struct Archive {
  T t;
};  // struct Archive

template <typename Message, typename T>
void serialize(const Message& msg, Archive<T>* const ar);

struct Signal {
  void* payload;
};

template <typename T> struct Wrapper {
  Signal* pack() {
    Signal* s = new Signal;
    archive(&serialize, &s->payload);
    return s;
  }

  template <typename P>
  void archive(void(*f)(const T&, Archive<P>* const), void** payload) {
    Archive<P> ar;
    f(t, &ar);
    P* p = new P;
    *p = ar.t;
    *payload = p;
  }

  T t;
};

struct TestMsg {
  int i;
};

template <>
void serialize(const TestMsg& msg, Archive<int>* const ar) {
  ar->t = msg.i;
}

int main() {
  Wrapper<TestMsg> msg;
  msg.pack();
  return 0;
}

Compiler claims that it cannot deduce the P type. Is there any other way (without traits) to help compiler with such deduction?

Kind Regard, Gracjan

EDIT(14-05-2013 15:42): According to the request in comment I attach the Traits solution:

/****** Library part *******/
template <typename T> struct Archive {
  T t;
};  // struct Archive

template <typename T> struct MessageTrait {};

template <typename Message, typename T>
void serialize(const Message& msg, Archive<T>* const ar);

struct Signal {
  void* payload;
};

template <typename T> struct Wrapper {
  Signal* pack() {
    typedef Archive<typename MessageTrait<T>::ArchType> ArchiveType;
    Signal* s = new Signal;
    ArchiveType ar;
    serialize(t, &ar);
    return s;
  }

  T t;
};

/****** Application part ******/
struct TestMsg {
  int i;
};

template<> struct MessageTrait<TestMsg> {
  typedef int ArchType;
};

template <>
void serialize(const TestMsg& msg, Archive<int>* const ar) {
  ar->t = msg.i;
}

int main() {
  Wrapper<TestMsg> msg;
  msg.pack();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
s->payload is a void*. This doesn't match with Archive<P>* const. What do you expect to happen? Also your template specialisation syntax for serialize is incorrect. And you're taking the address of a template function without giving it template parameters when you do &serialize which is wrong. –  Seth Carnegie May 14 '13 at 3:41
    
Specialization for serialize method is correct. What I expect is that the compiler find the best match to the expected function with using of knowledge of the first parameter type. To be independent of the definition lookup I have used the using directive whitch provide the base definition. So the serialize function in other scopes could not be templated, to be used correctly. –  fttrobin May 14 '13 at 4:56
    
Currently, to omit this problem (homefuly temporary) I have introduced the MessageTrait: template <typename T> struct MessageTrait {}; template<> struct MessageTrait<TestMsg> { typdef int ArchiveType; }; –  fttrobin May 14 '13 at 4:59
    
Oh hmm, I didn't know you didn't have to specify the types in a complete specialisation. –  Seth Carnegie May 14 '13 at 7:30
    
The solution seems overly complicated, is the problem so hard? Also, it probably would make sense if you posted the real code, you mention in the comment I have used the using directive... but there is no using directive... Can you describe the problem and the solution in simple terms? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 14 '13 at 13:32

1 Answer 1

template <typename Message, typename T>
void serialize(const Message& msg, Archive<T>* const ar);

template <typenane T>
Signal* Wrapper<T>::pack() {
    Signal* s = new Signal;
    archive(&serialize, &s->payload);
    return s;
}

In the above code, serialize is the name of a template, and used in place of a function it represents the complete set of overloads result from all possible specializations of the template (i.e. every possible substitution of the template arguments). At the same time archive is a template that can potentially take any function from the subset that comply with the minimal restriction that the second argument is an instantiation of the Archive template.

The problem here is not that the template cannot deduce the argument, but that there are infinite types that match the requirements, your problem is too open ended. Which brings the next question, does everything need to be a template?

In general it is a bad idea to specialize function templates, could the serialize template be really an overload? Can you reduce the generality of the problem to a situation where deducible or not there is just one or two candidates? I have the feeling that you are opening yourself to too many degrees of liberty that you might or not need and then getting bit by the fact that anything can match.

share|improve this answer
    
However I cannot not declare the serialize function, because even template method needs its declaration to be visible in the translation unit. I was trying to declare the "dummy" serialize function i.e. struct invalid {}; void serialize(invalid const&, Archive<invalid>* const); but the deduction fails too. –  fttrobin May 14 '13 at 14:02
    
@fttrobin: I don't understand the comment at all. You can write non-templated serialize functions that will be accessible through ADL. They need not be visible where the template is defined, but need to be visible at the point of instantiation, which should be fine, since you are already passing the type to be serialized to the template... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 14 '13 at 14:40
    
I'm completely out of idea how declare it as non-template function, where I expect to get the specialized Archive class. Can I ask you to give an example? –  fttrobin May 14 '13 at 16:27

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