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I originally tried this, however the % operator isn't defined for float64.

func main(){
    var a float64
    a = 1.23
    if a%1 == 0{
        fmt.Println("yay")
    }else{
        fmt.Println("you fail")
    }
}
share|improve this question

You can just compare the float value with a converted integer value to see if they're the same:

if a == float64(int64(a)) {
    fmt.Println("yay")
} else {
    fmt.Println("you fail")
}

That's valid for numbers that are small enough to fit in an int64, otherwise you can use the math.Trunc function detailed here.

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't seem like a well-typed Go expression. Go insists that both operands to == be of the exact same type. – Gian May 14 '13 at 4:05
    
In fact, having tried it, it is rejected as not-well-typed for the aforementioned reasons. One would need to cast back to float first. – Gian May 14 '13 at 4:07
    
Yes, you're right, I forgot that bit, edited to fix. – paxdiablo May 14 '13 at 4:10
    
As with Deepu's answer this fails when the integer part of the expression is over 2^63. @TimStClair and @Gian have the idea (keep it a float, but use math to separate the int and fractional part). – twotwotwo Feb 2 at 21:48
    
@twotwotwo, yes, it will. That's why I have the bit about it being suitable for numbers within the range of an int64, and why I provided a link to the truncate function for situations where you want to use the full range. I'm not sure if you just missed that final paragraph or not so, if you have an issue that's not already covered in the anwser or if I've misunderstood (entirely possible), please let me know and I'll try to fix it up. – paxdiablo Feb 2 at 22:58

How about math.Trunc? It truncates a float64 to its whole-number component.

For example, something like:

if a.Trunc() == a {
    // ...
}

Beware of the usual considerations about floating-point representation limitations. You might wish to check whether a.Trunc() is within some small range of a, to account for values like 1.00000000000000002.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks close, but it's math.Trunc(a) not a.Trunc(). Whole corrected if is something like if aa := math.Trunc(a)-a; aa < 1e-5 && aa > -1e-5 {...} – twotwotwo Feb 2 at 21:51

You can use the math.Modf function:

const epsilon = 1e-9 // Margin of error
if _, frac := math.Modf(math.Abs(a)); frac < epsilon || frac > 1.0 - epsilon {
    // ...
}

epsilon is necessary here since floating point math is not precise (e.g. float64(.3)+float64(.6)+float64(.1) != 1)

From the godoc:

func Modf(f float64) (int float64, frac float64)

Modf returns integer and fractional floating-point numbers that sum to f. Both values have the same sign as f.

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1  
Because floating point results usually aren't exact I would use Modf but check if the number is close to an integer, like this. Otherwise float64(.3)+float64(.6)+float64(.1) will be treated as a noninteger. – twotwotwo Feb 2 at 21:46
    
(Note that the types in that sample "bad" float value are necessary to see the problem because Go goes to extra trouble to make math on untyped constants more precise.) – twotwotwo Feb 2 at 21:54
1  
Good point, fixed to include this. Thanks! – Tim St. Clair Feb 2 at 22:53

I think the following code might be useful,

func main(){
    var (
          a float64
          b float64
          c float64
    ) 
    a = 1.23
    b = float64(int64(a))
    c = a - b
    if c > 0 {
        fmt.Println("Not a Whole Number")
    } else {
        fmt.Println("Whole Number")
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
There seems to be a danger of overflowing b here? – Gian May 14 '13 at 4:08
1  
The problem is that a is a float64 that is being coerced to an int, at which point it may overflow the (32-bit) int type and result in a wacky loss of precision (or indeed, a false negative). – Gian May 14 '13 at 4:21
    
I believe it is O.K now. – Deepu May 14 '13 at 4:23
    
Looks good to me. – Gian May 14 '13 at 4:31
    
Still overflows for, e.g. 1e30, just now the overflow is in the temporary value used in the calculation of b. Gian's and Tim St. Clair's answers seem like the approach (and Tim's compiles and shows how to handle rounding error, so it's my pick). – twotwotwo Feb 2 at 22:58

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