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I originally tried this, however the % operator isn't defined for float64.

func main(){
    var a float64
    a = 1.23
    if a%1 == 0{
        fmt.Println("yay")
    }else{
        fmt.Println("you fail")
    }
}
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3 Answers

You can just compare the float value with a converted integer value to see if they're the same:

if a == float64(int64(a)) {
    fmt.Println("yay")
} else {
    fmt.Println("you fail")
}

That's valid for numbers that are small enough to fit in an int64, otherwise you can use the math.Trunc function detailed here.

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That doesn't seem like a well-typed Go expression. Go insists that both operands to == be of the exact same type. –  Gian May 14 '13 at 4:05
    
In fact, having tried it, it is rejected as not-well-typed for the aforementioned reasons. One would need to cast back to float first. –  Gian May 14 '13 at 4:07
    
Yes, you're right, I forgot that bit, edited to fix. –  paxdiablo May 14 '13 at 4:10
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How about math.Trunc? It truncates a float64 to its whole-number component.

For example, something like:

if a.Trunc() == a {
    // ...
}

Beware of the usual considerations about floating-point representation limitations. You might wish to check whether a.Trunc() is within some small range of a, to account for values like 1.00000000000000002.

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I think the following code might be useful,

func main(){
    var (
          a float64
          b float64
          c float64
    ) 
    a = 1.23
    b = float64(int64(a))
    c = a - b
    if c > 0 {
        fmt.Println("Not a Whole Number")
    } else {
        fmt.Println("Whole Number")
    }
}
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There seems to be a danger of overflowing b here? –  Gian May 14 '13 at 4:08
    
The problem is that a is a float64 that is being coerced to an int, at which point it may overflow the (32-bit) int type and result in a wacky loss of precision (or indeed, a false negative). –  Gian May 14 '13 at 4:21
    
I believe it is O.K now. –  Deepu May 14 '13 at 4:23
    
Looks good to me. –  Gian May 14 '13 at 4:31
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