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I'm a D3 noob trying to figure out transitions and wanting to work with multiple datasets. I've looked thru the other questions, and not found an answer to use of two datasets. This jsfiddle shows what I'm trying to do. I'm building an app to help intro stat students draw random samples. They will get to set probabilities -- portions of the donut chart -- and choose the number of draws to sample. THen the donut turns and the sample pops up as a circle.

Two datasets: One (pieData) holds values and labels for the donut chart.
another (drawData) the random values from 360 to 720. Eventually both will be generated in R and passed into D3 using RJSONIO and shiny. (That part works, the jsfiddle shows the problem)

I've defined the donut as arcs based on dataset pieData which I attached as g.slices to my svg object. I added circles, and gave them the drawData to identify their colors.

The rotation animation on the donut needs the drawData. My jsfiddle does it clumsily with a for loop, but I only get to see the last draw's angle (five times) instead of seeing five different angles each once.

I am lacking understanding of several key points: I've defined a function within a loop which I know is a no-no. Here's my loop over the number of draws which spins the donut the right number of times, but always to the same angle (last one).

for (var i = 0; i < nDraws; i++) {
  ndx = i
  arcs.transition()
    .delay((slideDuration + spinDuration) * ndx)
    .duration(spinDuration)
    .ease("cubic-out")
    .attrTween("transform", function () {
    return d3.interpolateString("rotate( 0, 0, 0)",
        "rotate(" + spinAngle[ndx] + ", 0, 0)");
  });
}

I've created another counter to use inside my function because "i" didn't get passed through. Here's my transition on circles which does work OK:

circles.each(function(d,i){
   var  ndx = i ;
  d3.select(this).transition()
      //  toss out the circle
      .delay(spinDuration + (slideDuration + spinDuration) * ndx )
      .duration( slideDuration )
      .ease("linear")
      .attr("cx", function(d,i) { return ndx * spacing - w /2 ; })
      .attr("cy", 135)
      .attr("r", 20);
});

and I'm missing the point on how to structure the program nicely. The closest I've found for an example is chained transitions, from which I've learned that both circles and arcs need to belong to a common parent, and I should apply two transitions to the parent.

Help would be much appreciated with these questions:

1) Can I combine my two datasets (with different columns and different numbers of rows?

2) How would I build a parent to contain both donut and sampled circles, and how would I feed it two datasets?

3) Functions are not working for me as I'd like them to. I think I'm trying to return objects, but d3 wants returns to be functions (?)

Many thanks in advance for places to learn how to fit all the pieces together. D3 plots are wonderful.

JimRC

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to NoahRC who gave me a solution. The first block of code should define the function of "i" before the loop:

var tween = function(i){
  arcs.transition()
  .delay((slideDuration + spinDuration) * i)
  .duration(spinDuration)
  .ease("cubic-out")
  .attrTween("transform", function (){
     return d3.interpolateString("rotate( 0, 0, 0)", 
                         "rotate(" +  data.spinAngle[i] + ", 0, 0)");
  });
  }

for( var i = 0; i < data.nDraws; i++){ 
    tween(i);
}

And the second block will find "i":

circles.each(function(d,i){
  d3.select(this).transition()
    .delay(spinDuration + (slideDuration + spinDuration) * i )
    .duration( slideDuration )
    .ease("linear")
    .attr("cx", function() { return i * spacing - w /2 ; })
    .attr("cy", 135)
    .attr("r", 20);
});

Traces showed that i was getting set to data.nDraws + 1, so it wouldn't work as an extractor.

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