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pI am trying to run sequential countdown timers but can't figure out how to wait for the timer to finish before moving onto the next item.

for(var i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
  var count = 5;
  var counter = setInterval(timer, 1000);
}
function timer()
{
 count--;
if (count <= 0)
{
 $('.workout-timer').text(count + "secs");
 clearInterval(counter);
 return;
}
$('.workout-timer').text(count + "secs");
}

This just goes into negative, however without the for loop the code counts down from 5 to 0 just fine. So my question is how would get several countdowns one after another? is the timer not the right way to go about it?

share|improve this question
    
Don't create 5 intervals. Create one (without a loop). –  user2246674 May 14 '13 at 5:45
    
why not use setTimeout? –  akonsu May 14 '13 at 5:46
    
@user2246674 what does this mean? –  akonsu May 14 '13 at 5:47
    
@akonsu "why not use setTimeout?" <-- Justify, please. If I'm eating peanut butter, tell me why I should switch to jam. –  user2246674 May 14 '13 at 5:48
    
the original poster wants to run timers in a succession and cancels them when the handler is called. this is what setTimeout is for. –  akonsu May 14 '13 at 5:50

2 Answers 2

You could do something like this:

function startCountdown(count, delay, callback) {
    if (!count) {
        callback && callback();
        return;
    }

    //do something here
    console.log(count);

    setTimeout(function () {
        startCountdown(--count, delay, callback);
    }, delay);
}

startCountdown(5, 1000, function () {
    startCountdown(5, 1500);
});

However this can get messy if you have a lot of nested callbacks, but here's one out of many approach you could use to deal with that issue:

var queue = [
        { count: 5, delay: 1000 },
        { count: 10, delay: 200 },
        { count: 5, delay: 5000 }
    ];

processNextCountdown();

function processNextCountdown() {
    var options = queue.shift();

    if (options) {
        startCountdown(options.count, options.delay, processNextCountdown);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why use a timeout over an interval? –  user2246674 May 14 '13 at 5:47
    
because you do not have to cancel it. –  akonsu May 14 '13 at 5:48
    
@akonsu .. so? You only have to create one interval. –  user2246674 May 14 '13 at 5:49
    
How would i get this to run sequentially? say 10 back to back countdowns? –  user975044 May 14 '13 at 5:51
    
I am to achieve multiple countdowns so: 5-4-3-2-1 then again 5-4-3-2-1 –  user975044 May 14 '13 at 5:59

Intervals are like timeouts that will reschedule themselves (which differs from a timeout starting a new timeout). Since intervals reschedule themselves, only create one. (Or, only as many as really necessary.)

The problem with the original post is it was creating 5 intervals (because they were being created in the loop) and then only keeping the interval ID (in counter) of the last interval created! Thus the clearInterval only stopped the last interval and the other 4 intervals kept running and running and running ..

Here is some cleaned up code with comments and without the original problem:

var count = 5;
// only need ONE interval
var counter = setInterval(timer, 1000);
// so we do one count RIGHT NOW
timer();

function timer() {
  // display first, so we start at 5: 5, 4 .. 1
  console.log(count);
  count--;
  if (count < 0) {
    // to repeat the count, comment out the clearInterval
    // and do `count = 5;` or similar .. take it from here :D
    clearInterval(counter);
  }
}

To create separate "state" for each countdown, either create a new countdown object that maintains state in properties or use a closure. Here is an example with a closure. I have also added support for a callback function to show how such a function can be made more generic:

function makeCountdown(startCount, delay, fn) {
    fn = fn || function (i) {
       // default action, if fn not specified
       console.log(i);
    };
    // local variables
    var count = startCount;
    var counter = setInterval(timer, delay);
    timer();

    function timer() {
        // now count and counter refer to variables in the closure (keyword!)
        // which are different each time makeCountdown is called.
        fn(count);
        count--;
        if (count < 0) {
            clearInterval(counter);
        }
    }
}

makeCountdown(20, 500); // uses default function
makeCountdown(10, 1000, function (i) { console.log(10 - i) });
makeCountdown(5, 2000, function (i) { console.log("SLOW! " + i) });

Exercises:

  1. Add a callback function for when the countdown is "done" so that countdowns can be run in series.
  2. Consume a series generator and use that to generate the next count value.
  3. Have makeCountdown return an object that can be used to control the countdown.
  4. Have fun!
share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't address the issue I have, I am actually trying to get 5 separate countdowns that happen one after another –  user975044 May 14 '13 at 6:03
    
@user975044 Updated with an example that uses closures to remember the "count" and "counter" variables per interval. –  user2246674 May 14 '13 at 6:12
    
@user975044 This can get as fun/complex/generic as needed. jQuery has a queue implementation for dealing with animations - e.g. move left 20, then fade out –  user2246674 May 14 '13 at 6:14

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