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I have a struct

struct Packet {
    int senderId;
    int sequenceNumber;
    char data[MaxDataSize];

    char* Serialize() {
        char *message = new char[MaxMailSize];
        message[0] = senderId;
        message[1] = sequenceNumber;
        for (unsigned i=0;i<MaxDataSize;i++)
            message[i+2] = data[i];
        return message;
    }

    void Deserialize(char *message) {
        senderId = message[0];
        sequenceNumber = message[1];
        for (unsigned i=0;i<MaxDataSize;i++)
            data[i] = message[i+2];
    }

};

I need to convert this to a char* , maximum length MaxMailSize > MaxDataSize for sending over network and then deserialize it at the other end

I can't use tpl or any other library.

Is there any way to make this better I am not that comfortable with this, or is this the best we can do.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

since this is to be sent over a network, i strongly advise you to convert those data into network byte order before transmitting, and back into host byte order when receiving. this is because the byte ordering is not the same everywhere, and once your bytes are not in the right order, it may become very difficult to reverse them (depending on the programming language used on the receiving side). byte ordering functions are defined along with sockets, and are named htons(), htonl(), ntohs() and ntohl(). (in those name: h means 'host' or your computer, n means 'network', s means 'short' or 16bit value, l means 'long' or 32 bit value).

then you are on your own with serialization, C and C++ have no automatic way to perform it. some softwares can generate code to do it for you, like the ASN.1 implementation asn1c, but they are difficult to use because they involve much more than just copying data over the network.

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Thanks for the help! I'll try this out. –  Ankur Chauhan Nov 4 '09 at 2:14

You can have a class reprensenting the object you use in your software with all the niceties and member func and whatever you need. Then you have a 'serialized' struct that's more of a description of what will end up on the network.

To ensure the compiler will do whatever you tell him to do, you need to instruct it to 'pack' the structure. The directive I used here is for gcc, see your compiler doc if you're not using gcc.

Then the serialize and deserialize routine just convert between the two, ensuring byte order and details like that.

#include <arpa/inet.h>   /* ntohl htonl */
#include <string.h>      /* memcpy */

class Packet {
    int senderId;
    int sequenceNumber;
    char data[MaxDataSize];
public:
    char* Serialize();
    void Deserialize(char *message);
};

struct SerializedPacket {
    int senderId;
    int sequenceNumber;
    char data[MaxDataSize];
} __attribute__((packed));

void* Packet::Serialize() {
    struct SerializedPacket *s = new SerializedPacket();
    s->senderId = htonl(this->senderId);
    s->sequenceNumber = htonl(this->sequenceNumber);
    memcpy(s->data, this->data, MaxDataSize);
    return s;
}

void Packet::Deserialize(void *message) {
    struct SerializedPacket *s = (struct SerializedPacket*)message;
    this->senderId = ntohl(s->senderId);
    this->sequenceNumber = ntohl(s->sequenceNumber);
    memcpy(this->data, s->data, MaxDataSize);
}
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1  
is it going to be safe to deallocate the void * returned by serialize with a simple delete ptr? Its been a while since I worked in C++, but since you're allocating heap memory you'll need to deallocate it somewhere. –  Jherico Oct 31 '09 at 16:42
    
Mmmm, no probably not (at least not guaranteed). It's probably better to use malloc() and use free() then. –  246tNt Oct 31 '09 at 16:44
    
Or better yet, forget allocating memory on the heap; just use the same internal stack buffer for serialization and deserialization –  Charles Salvia Oct 31 '09 at 22:02
    
@246tNt How can this work when the signature is a void* in the implementation, char* in the deceleration, but s, the variable you are returning, is a SerializedPacket? –  publ1c_stat1c Aug 31 '12 at 5:51

Depending if you have enough place or not... you might simply use the streams :)

std::string Serialize() {
  std::ostringstream out;
  char version = '1';
  out << version << senderId << '|' << sequenceNumber << '|' << data;
  return out.str();
}

void Deserialize(const std::string& iString)
{
  std::istringstream in(iString);
  char version = 0, check1 = 0, check2 = 0;
  in >> version;
  switch(version)
  {
  case '1':
    senderId >> check1 >> sequenceNumber >> check2 >> data;
    break;
  default:
    // Handle
  }
  // You can check here than 'check1' and 'check2' both equal to '|'
}

I readily admit it takes more place... or that it might.

Actually, on a 32 bits architecture an int usually cover 4 bytes (4 char). Serializing them using streams only take more than 4 'char' if the value is superior to 9999, which usually gives some room.

Also note that you should probably include some guards in your stream, just to check when you get it back that it's alright.

Versioning is probably a good idea, it does not cost much and allows for unplanned later development.

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int senderId;
int sequenceNumber;
...    
char *message = new char[MaxMailSize];
message[0] = senderId;
message[1] = sequenceNumber;

You're overwriting values here. senderId and sequenceNumber are both ints and will take up more than sizeof(char) bytes on most architectures. Try something more like this:

char * message = new char[MaxMailSize];
int offset = 0;
memcpy(message + offset, &senderId, sizeof(senderId));
offset += sizeof(senderId);
memcpy(message + offset, &sequenceNumber, sizeof(sequenceNumber));
offset += sizeof(sequenceNumber);
memcpy(message + offset, data, MaxDataSize);

EDIT: fixed code written in a stupor. Also, as noted in comment, any such packet is not portable due to endian differences.

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The second argument to memcpy takes const void*, but you are passing it the int. It should be: memcpy(message + offset, &senderId, sizeof(senderId)). Also, you do not need the last memcpy, as data need not be serialized since it is merely the buffer used for unserialization. –  Charles Salvia Oct 31 '09 at 8:25
1  
He's not overwriting anything when assigning an int to a char. He is (possibly) truncating their values, though. –  Charles Bailey Oct 31 '09 at 9:44
    
-1 The use of memcpy for senderId and sequenceNumber is not portable, as you can't guarantee the byte order for these values. Better to do it with shifting and masking. –  Steve Melnikoff Oct 31 '09 at 12:18
    
I clearly shouldn't respond to questions so late at night. @Charles, I know he was truncating values, but I was thinking in terms of his intent and had be been using those target offsets with memcpy, he would have been overwriting the last 3 bytes of senderId –  Jherico Oct 31 '09 at 16:42

You can use memcpy instead of the for loop

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To answer your question generally, C++ has no reflection mechanism, and so manual serialize and unserialize functions defined on a per-class basis is the best you can do. That being said, the serialization function you wrote will mangle your data. Here is a correct implementation:

char * message = new char[MaxMailSize];
int net_senderId = htonl(senderId);
int net_sequenceNumber = htonl(sequenceNumber);
memcpy(message, &net_senderId, sizeof(net_senderId));
memcpy(message + sizeof(net_senderId), &net_sequenceNumber, sizeof(net_sequenceNumber));
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As mentioned in other posts, senderId and sequenceNumber are both of type int, which is likely to be larger than char, so these values will be truncated.

If that's acceptable, then the code is OK. If not, then you need to split them into their constituent bytes. Given that the protocol you are using will specifiy the byte order of multi-byte fields, the most portable, and least ambiguous, way of doing this is through shifting.

For example, let's say that senderId and sequenceNumber are both 2 bytes long, and the protocol requires that the higher byte goes first:

char* Serialize() {
    char *message = new char[MaxMailSize];

    message[0] = senderId >> 8;
    message[1] = senderId;

    message[2] = sequenceNumber >> 8;
    message[3] = sequenceNumber;

    memcpy(&message[4], data, MaxDataSize);

    return message;
}

I'd also recommend replacing the for loop with memcpy (if available), as it's unlikely to be less efficient, and it makes the code shorter.

Finally, this all assumes that char is one byte long. If it isn't, then all the data will need to be masked, e.g.:

    message[0] = (senderId >> 8) & 0xFF;
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You can use Protocol Buffers for defining and serializing of structs and classes. This is what google uses internally, and has a very small transfer mechanism.

http://code.google.com/apis/protocolbuffers/

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