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I have a method called TryMe which has try catch block and catches his exceptions.
I call him from another class, but when an exception occurs it doesn't stop the code execution.
Example:

public void TryMe()
{
    try
    {
        SomeMethod();
    }
    catch(Exception exception){
        MessageBox.Show(exception.Message);
    }
}


     //Method calling
     Actions CAactions = new Actions();
     CActions.TryMe();
     ///////////////////////////////////
     //If exception is handled it should stop to here.

     this.Hide();
     FormActions FormActions = new FormActions();

The method definition is in class file. The method calling is in the windows form.
The problem is that it just shows the messagebox and the code execution continues.
I want to stop the code after the exception catching and not hiding the form. If everything is okay it should hide it.
Maybe my conceptions is wrong?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The easiest fix would be to change your funcion to return true/false depending on whether it succeeded or not (i.e. only hide the form if the TryMe method didn't get an error):

 public bool TryMe()
 {
  try
   {
    SomeMethod();
    return true;
   }
   catch (Exception exception)
   {
    // log exception 
    return false;
   }
  }

and call it like this:

 if (CActions.TryMe())
 {
   this.Hide();
 }

Another option would be to re throw the exception after showing the message, and have the calling code handle it in a try catch:

public void TryMe()
{
 try
 {
   SomeMethod();
  }
   catch (Exception exception)
  {
   // log exception? 
   throw;
  }
  }

calling code:

   try 
   {
     CActions.TryMe();
     this.Hide();
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
      // error handling
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Is this a good coding practice? I'm newbie to C# and if my whole error handling model thinking is wrong, the best moment to change it is right now. :) –  Paul Reed May 14 '13 at 7:08
    
There are a number of options - you could rethrow the error from TryMe (by putting Throw() in the catch block) and have the calling code also handle the error –  NDJ May 14 '13 at 7:10
    
Sure, this is an option. But which one is the best? I mean the balance between accurate working, clean and readable code? –  Paul Reed May 14 '13 at 7:12
1  
I think it boils down to if the exception is expected and you know your method can deal with it, then go down the bool route - if the exception is just that - an exception - then the calling code should have the try/catch –  NDJ May 14 '13 at 7:18

You should avoid calling MessageBox.Show() anywhere, but on UI side of your application (e.g. your Form). It is considered a bad practice. So i would modify NDJ's answer:

public bool TryMe()
{
   try
   {
       SomeMethod();
       return true;
   }
   catch (Exception exception)
   {
       //insert some logging here, if YOU need the callstack of your exception
       return false;
   }
}

if (CActions.TryMe())
{
    this.Hide();
}
else
{
    MessageBox.Show(...); //insert some meaningful message, useful to END-USER here, not some "Null refrence exception!!11" message, which no one but you will understand
}
share|improve this answer

Another option is delegate control flow to a caller, so :

public void TryMe()
{
    try
    {
        SomeMethod();
    }
    catch(Exception exception){
       throw;
    }
}

and use it like

 Actions CAactions = new Actions();
 try {
    CActions.TryMe();
    //continue, all ok.
 }
 catch(Excepiton ex) {
      //hide a form, exception happens inside a method
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But I'm wondering if is it a good practice to have a try-catch in the form class? –  Paul Reed May 14 '13 at 7:13
    
@PaulReed: sure, it's one of the ways to do that. Form class is your caller, so it knows what should happen if some call fails or succeed. –  Tigran May 14 '13 at 7:16
2  
throw exception; will overwrite the original exception's call stack. Is it intended? Usually it is better to use just throw; –  Artemix May 14 '13 at 8:29
    
@Artemix: nailed, corrected. –  Tigran May 14 '13 at 8:43

as your code states, the Exception is being caught and it's Message property passed to a MessageBox. That means that, in no way, your code is being interrupted or the Exception given the opportunity to bubble up.

On a side note: it's considered somewhat bad practice to display a MessageBox in a class try/catch (or any other method for that matter). The reason for this is obvious: it makes your class dependent on being used in a graphical application environment and that goes against class reusability. It's better to propagate the Exception along a method return type that any type of application could handle, e.g. a string containing the Message and/or the InnerException text.

You could then do e.g.

string methodResult = myObject.MyMethod();
if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(myMethodResult)) //... everything worked out ok
...
else //well then at least you have an error message to work with
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