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I am trying to hash an unsigned long value, but the hash function takes an unsigned char *, as seen in the implementation below:

unsigned long djb2(unsigned char *key, int n)
{
    unsigned long hash = 5381;
    int i = 0;
    while (i < n-8) {
        hash = hash * 33 + key[i++];
        hash = hash * 33 + key[i++];
        hash = hash * 33 + key[i++];
        hash = hash * 33 + key[i++];
        hash = hash * 33 + key[i++];
        hash = hash * 33 + key[i++];
        hash = hash * 33 + key[i++];
        hash = hash * 33 + key[i++];
    }
    while (i < n)
        hash = hash * 33 + key[i++];
    return hash;
}

Is there a way I can achieve my goal, perhaps with a cast between the two?

share|improve this question
    
reinterpret_cast, but it's ugly. What hashing function requires char*? –  Pubby May 14 '13 at 7:07
2  
@Pubby, reinterpret_cast is C++, the question is for C. –  druciferre May 14 '13 at 7:14
    
it might just be me, but I think that there should be more context ( ie more code ) in this question. –  Taylor Flores May 14 '13 at 7:14
    
@druciferre It wasn't tagged when I commented ;) –  Pubby May 14 '13 at 7:17
2  
from a look at the function, you better hope that your long is 8 bytes long. otherwise use long long. otherwise you might get segmentation errors –  Taylor Flores May 14 '13 at 7:28
show 5 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted
unsigned long x;

unsigned char * p = (unsigned char*)&x;

Make sure you use all 4 bytes through the p, or whatever is the length of unsigned long on your system.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by "use all 4 bytes through the p"? sorry, I am new to c –  James May 14 '13 at 7:15
3  
And also, don't forget about endian issues! You might get different hashes for the 'same' data on different machines if you don't swap endian appropriately. –  tangrs May 14 '13 at 7:17
2  
p is a pointer. It points to the first byte of your unsigned long. In this case a variable named 'x'. I guess you have a function taking an usnigned char pointer and some length. If that's the case, the length should be sizeof( usnigned long ), or sizeof( x ). –  user1764961 May 14 '13 at 7:18
2  
@MattPhillips That's assuming the hash function takes a null terminated string as input. Usually, hashing functions take a length parameter and buffer pointer, not a null terminated string. –  tangrs May 14 '13 at 7:19
1  
@MattPhillips I don't know anyone knows if the function requires a null termination since we have not seen the function yet. A char * doesn't always mean string –  Taylor Flores May 14 '13 at 7:21
show 8 more comments

Technically you can achieve it with:

unsigned long value = 58281;
djb2((unsigned char *) &value, sizeof(value));

Mind the usual pitfalls, however:

  • The hash function in question was originally meant for strings (hence the prototype), so make sure it fits your needs (# of collisions, avalanching, etc.)
  • If at some point you want to hash very large objects for which sizeof(object) > (int) sizeof(object) (if applicable on your architecture(s)), note you might get out of bounds accesses (undefined behaviour) or only part of your object hashed.
share|improve this answer
    
I think sizeof x instead of sizeof(x) is even rarer than return(x) instead of return x :) –  icepack May 14 '13 at 8:20
    
A bad habit, perhaps. :-) –  Michael Foukarakis May 14 '13 at 8:23
    
I actually find it refreshing :) –  icepack May 14 '13 at 8:26
add comment

As other said, you can easily read an int or any other object as a char array :

unsigned char value = 0xde;
unsigned short value = 0xdead;
unsigned long value = 0xdeadbeef;
double value = 1./3;

djb2((unsigned char*)&value, sizeof value);

But note that 0xdead stored in a short or a long won't have the same hash.

Also note that your hash function could be better unrolled using a Duff's device :

unsigned long djb2(unsigned char *k, int size)
{
    unsigned long h = 5381;
    int i = 0;
    switch(size % 8) {
      case 0: while(i < size) { 
                  h = h*33 + k[i++];
      case 7:     h = h*33 + k[i++];
      case 6:     h = h*33 + k[i++];
      case 5:     h = h*33 + k[i++];
      case 4:     h = h*33 + k[i++];
      case 3:     h = h*33 + k[i++];
      case 2:     h = h*33 + k[i++];
      case 1:     h = h*33 + k[i++];
              }
    }
    return h;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, interesting unrolling technique –  icepack May 14 '13 at 9:41
add comment

This shows a cast working. Note that in this case the "ABC" string will be null terminated but this may require more care in real world cases

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    unsigned long x=0x414243;  #0x414243 is ABC
    unsigned char *s=(unsigned char *)&x;
    printf("%s", s);
}
share|improve this answer
    
In your example, it'll be ABC but only on big endian systems. Edit: Actually, on big endian systems, it would just be a empty string. –  tangrs May 14 '13 at 7:24
    
yeah, it's "CBA" here on a typical intel Linux system :) –  Vorsprung May 14 '13 at 7:24
add comment

Since you've posted your code now, you'd want to use something similar to this:

#include <stdio.h>


int main() {
    unsigned long result, x = 0xdeadbeef;
    x = convert_endian(x);

    result = djb2((unsigned char*)&x, sizeof(x));
    do_something(result);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
No it's not. It'll work fine with any size –  icepack May 14 '13 at 7:47
    
@icepack it still loops with less than 8 bytes but produces segmentation faults. in that way, it does expect a buffer of size % 8 == 0 –  Taylor Flores May 14 '13 at 7:50
    
@TaylorFlores Look closer, it won't loop if size < 8. –  icepack May 14 '13 at 7:53
    
yeah i did, you're right about that. but it can still produce segmentation faults when size % 8 != 0 –  Taylor Flores May 14 '13 at 7:57
1  
ugh, yeah you're right. I guess I should test my suggestions more often. I do still think that the first while loop is unnecessary –  Taylor Flores May 14 '13 at 8:11
show 6 more comments

You should convert it using ultoa_s

share|improve this answer
    
he never said string. the question is about casting data types –  Taylor Flores May 14 '13 at 7:17
    
Can't you convert ulong to a null-terminated character string and use the pointer? –  dizzer May 14 '13 at 7:21
    
@dizzer: How do you expect 0x10000010 to look like as a 0-terminated string? –  glglgl May 14 '13 at 7:25
    
@dizzer you have assumed that char * is a string and it might not be. you also have showed the user a function that converts a ulong into a string representation of a number - that is not casting –  Taylor Flores May 14 '13 at 7:27
    
@TaylorFlores you are right, char* doesn't mean it is string needed. –  dizzer May 14 '13 at 7:31
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