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I have an interface iClass defined. One method in the interface takes another interface, iObject, as an argument.

In one specific implementation of iClass, I need the method to take a specific implementation of iObject, ObjectImplementation - but C# tells me I need to implement the method as is.

Why is this? isn't ObjectImplementation an instance of iObject? How do I get around this? I tried using an abstract class instead and I get into the same mess.

public interface iClass {
    bool SomeMethod(iObject object);
}

public interface iObject {
    ... // some methods here
}

public ObjectImplementation : iObject {
    ... // some method implementations here
}

public ClassImplementation : iClass {
    public bool SomeMethod(ObjectImplementation object) // <- C# compiler yells at me
    {

    }
}
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2 Answers 2

The contract clearly states that the method requires an iObject. ObjectImplementation is one class implementing this interface. But there might be others. The contract of iClass states that all those implementations are valid parameters.

If you really need to constrain the parameter to ObjectImplementation consider using a generic interface:

public interface IClass<T> where T : IObject
{
    bool SomeMethod(T item);
}

public ClassImplementation : IClass<ObjectImplementation>
{
    public bool SomeMethod(ObjectImplementation item)
    {

    }
}
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Leaving the iObject as parameter is a way to go, this should also work:

public interface iClass {
    bool SomeMethod(iObject obj);
}

public interface iObject {
}

public class ObjectImplementation : iObject {
}

public class ClassImplementation : iClass {
    public bool SomeMethod(iObject obj)
    {
        return false;
    }
}
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This will not work if the implementation of SomeMethod in ClassImplementation really needs an ObjectImplementation and nothing else. E.g. because ObjectImplementation has additional members. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 14 '13 at 7:32

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