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I have seen the following:

angular.bootstrap(document, ['TodoApp']);
angular.bootstrap(angular.element("body")[0], ['TodoApp']);

Also the AngularJS documentation mentions this which I don't really understand.

   angular.element(document).ready(function() {
     angular.bootstrap(document);
   });

Is there any difference between these methods? In particular what is the last method from the Angular docs doing? Is one any better to use than the other?

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1  
Not a response, but an explanation: the third way is just a wrapper around jQuery Lite. It is a standard way of running some code when the document has been fully loaded and your scripts execution can start. If you look for any jquery tutorial, then you would find something like $(document).ready(function(){...}). In Angular angular.element(str) is similar to $(str). But keep in mind that this will use jQuery Lite, not regular jQuery. –  ŁukaszBachman May 14 '13 at 8:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 29 down vote accepted

They are roughly the same, with a few differences:


angular.bootstrap(document, ['TodoApp']);

This will work if you have your scripts loaded at the end of the page (instead of in the header).

Otherwise, the DOM will not be loaded at the time of bootrsaping the app (there won't be any template to be compiled, the directives won't have any effect).

This one works: plnkr

This one doesn't: plnkr


angular.bootstrap(angular.element("body")[0], ['TodoApp']);

The same as before, using body as the root of the application. It uses a selector that is not available in jqLite, so you need to have full jQuery included in the app.

I'm not sure what is the advantage of using body instead document, but probably has something to do with e2e testing, as explained in this comment

plknr


angular.element(document).ready(function() {
  angular.bootstrap(document);
});

This one actually waits for the DOM to be loaded, so it will work even if you include your scripts in the header.

This is basically the same as jQuery's $(document).ready( , but using jqLite's angular.element.


In the last example, no modules are being passed to the bootstrap function, most likely you will need to declare your main module, unless your app consists only on controllers in the global namespace.

So the last option will be like the following, in order to be similar to the other two:

angular.element(document).ready(function() {
  angular.bootstrap(document, ['TodoApp']);
});

plknr

I guess that most of the time the safest bet is using this last approach.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. A couple of questions. I looked at your plknrs but I notice I cannot see the contents of the script.js file. I try to click on script.js but it won't let me click on it. Is this because you marked them as private? In my case we're not using jQuery. So what would be the method you suggest for people who do not use jQuery? Thanks –  Anne May 14 '13 at 13:24
1  
jQuery is not needed at all for angular, unless you do thing like the second example. The last one seems better to me, that works without jQuery. Also the example in the angular docuemntation follows that approach of waiting for the DOM to be ready. –  gargc May 14 '13 at 14:24
    
About the plnkr's ... i don't know what could be wrong, they are anonymous, i don't see any special settings. –  gargc May 14 '13 at 14:26
    
@garc - Not sure why but the plknrs are working fine now. I'll mark your answer as accepted –  Anne May 14 '13 at 14:38
1  
If you want to bootstrap multiple times, do not use "document", but the root node of the Angular interface. For example: replace "document" with "jQuery('[ng-controller=MyAppController]')" –  Wouter Oct 30 at 9:08

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