Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following code

int i=0;
while(i<10) {
   printf("%d\n", i++);
}

is equivalent to

int i=0;
while(i<10) {
   printf("%d\n", i); i++;
}

But the following code

int i=0;
while(i<10) {
   printf("%d\n", i+=2);
}

is equivalent to

int i=0;
while(i<10) {
   i+=2; printf("%d\n", i);
}

How to make it equivalent to

int i=0;
while(i<10) {
   printf("%d\n", i); i+=2;
}

the same as i++

share|improve this question
9  
Out of curiosity, why on earth would you need something like this? –  Kerrek SB May 14 '13 at 8:35
1  
@C.Lang: Have you tested that?! –  Kerrek SB May 14 '13 at 8:35
1  
@TonyTheLion: I think the OP wants the opposite of that. –  Kerrek SB May 14 '13 at 8:35
4  
You answered your own question: use two statements (on two separate lines, of course). Why search an obfuscated solution with the simple one works perfectly. –  James Kanze May 14 '13 at 8:36
2  
@MOHAMED: Nothing to do with sequence points. Rather, you cannot use increment on built-in types on rvalues. –  Kerrek SB May 14 '13 at 8:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Curious as to how hard I'll be hit for suggesting something as obvious as:

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i += 2) {
    printf("%d\n", i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for this, obviously that's the answer –  Alter Mann May 14 '13 at 8:55
    
thank you for the answer it's simple and it give me an inspiration –  MOHAMED May 14 '13 at 8:56
4  
@MOHAMED Wow, unfortunately the fact that it was just a for loop you were after makes the question much more trivial than I initially thought. –  Christian Rau May 14 '13 at 9:08
    
@ChristianRau obviously having a behaviour of i+=2 the same as i++ is not supported. So there is no answer to my question. So I need an alternative solution. this answer give me an inspiration to change my while loop by a for loop. and I appreciate it –  MOHAMED May 14 '13 at 9:14
1  
@MOHAMED Yeah, indeed the for loop is the best solution in your example. I just was not aware of the fact that you weren't aware of for loops at all and interpreted the example as a simplified example demonstratng the overall general task. But at least you got a satisfying answer. –  Christian Rau May 14 '13 at 9:24

You can write a macro to do this too. Like this:

#define POSTINC(var, val) ((var) += (val), (var) - (val))

printf("%d\n", POSTINC(i,2));

But better use either for or just increase the value in the next statement.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for the answer it's interesting –  MOHAMED May 14 '13 at 8:54

you could maybe use this

1)

printf("%d",i++?(i++?i-2:(i-2)):(i++?i-2:0));

? introduces sequence point

there was nothing mentioned about readability. so i dint mind.

2)

printf("%d",(a++,a++,a-2));

,introduces sequence point. Here , inside the parantheses acts as comma operator and not the parameter separator.

share|improve this answer
    
Huh? Doesn't this achieve the same as i+=2 (return the incremented value rather than the value prior to incrementing), which is what the OP doesn't want? –  Christian Rau May 14 '13 at 8:49
    
@ChristianRau now editied. –  Koushik May 14 '13 at 9:03
    
Nearly, but now it won't work for the initial 0 (it will just do i++ in this case). –  Christian Rau May 14 '13 at 9:06
    
@ChristianRau that is true. but now the edit does:-) –  Koushik May 14 '13 at 9:09
    
Indeed it does, but to what price? ;) (no really, +1 for an interresting approach.) –  Christian Rau May 14 '13 at 9:26

the operator "++" has two meanings in C/C++ and maybe some-else C-like languages
1.if "++" is in front of a variable
like ++i; thus i will firstly plus one and the calculated value would be the statement's values for eg.: int i=0;
int k;
k=++i;
//k=1 i=1

2.if "++" is behind of a variable
like i++; thus the statement's values will be i's value and i pluses one for eg.: int i=0;
int k;
k=i++;
//k=0 i=1

share|improve this answer
    
Well yeah, so what? What made you think the OP hasn't realized this already (if he hadn't, he wouldn't ask the question in the first place)? Doesn't really provide an answer to the actual question, does it? –  Christian Rau May 14 '13 at 8:54
    
oh i'm trying to explain that how "1++" works and actually i didn't give an answer. sorry about that –  Chu Ya'an Xiaonan May 14 '13 at 9:02
int i=2;
while(i<10) {
   printf("%d\n", i); i+=2;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.