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I'm trying to do a test on my controllers which get data from repository classes. This is the part of the repository I want to test:

public class NewsRepository
{
    public IEnumerable<NewsItem> GetNews()
    {
        var result = (from n in n_db.NewsItems
                     orderby n.ID descending
                     select n).Take(3);
        return result;
    }
}

Just some small code to get how the testing works. In my HomeController I've got this code inside the Index():

    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        ViewBag.Message = "Announcements";
        NewsRepository n_rep = new NewsRepository();
        var model = i_rep.GetNews();

        return View(model);
    }

I am completely new to testing so all explanations would be great. Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your controller is impossible to be unit tested in isolation because it is strongly coupled with your repository on the following line:

NewsRepository n_rep = new NewsRepository();

You have simply hardcoded a specific implementation of the repository and in your unit test you cannot mock it. In order to do this properly you should start by defining an abstraction over this repository:

public interface INewsRepository
{
    IEnumerable<NewsItem> GetNews();
}

and then have your specific repository implement this interface:

public class NewsRepository : INewsRepository
{
    ...
}

Ok now that we have an abstraction let's weaken the coupling between your data access and controller logic by using this abstraction:

public class NewsController: Controller
{
    private readonly INewsRepository repository;
    public NewsController(INewsRepository repository)
    {
        this.repository = repository;
    }

    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        ViewBag.Message = "Announcements";
        var model = this.repository.GetNews();
        return View(model);
    }    
}

Alright, now you have a controller that is no longer tightly coupled with some specific implementation. You could pickup your favorite mock framework and write a unit test. For example with NSubstitute here's how the unit test for the Index action might look like:

[TestMethod]
public void Index_Action_Fetches_Model_From_Repo()
{
    // arrange
    var repo = Substitute.For<INewsRepository>();
    IEnumerable<NewsItem> expectedNews = new[] { new NewsItem() };
    repo.GetNews().Returns(expectedNews);
    var sut = new NewsController(repo);

    // act
    var actual = sut.Index();

    // assert
    Assert.IsInstanceOfType(actual, typeof(ViewResult));
    var viewResult = actual as ViewResult;
    Assert.AreEqual(expectedNews, viewResult.Model);
}

And that's pretty much it. Your controller is now easily unit testable in isolation. You don't need to be setting up databases or whatever. That's not the point to test the controller logic.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes a lot of sense, and I don't see a reason why this is not the solution I'm looking for, but I get these errors: 1. in public NewsController(INewsRepository repository) The Error is: Inconsistent accessibility: parameter type 'TestProject.Models.INewsRepository' is less accessible than method 'TestProject.Controllers.NewsController.NewsController(TestProject.Models.INewsR‌​epository)' ---- 2. in the line: var repo = Substitute.For<INewsRepository>(); The Error: The name 'Substitute' does not exist in the current context. ---- Is there some namespace I might be missing? –  Mappan May 14 '13 at 10:52
    
Substitute, forgot to check the link. But the first error stands. –  Mappan May 14 '13 at 10:54
    
All your classes and interfaces need to be public as shown in my answer. As far as your error about NSubstitute is concerned, you need to install the NSubstitute NuGet in your unit test project. –  Darin Dimitrov May 14 '13 at 10:55
    
It all worked. Thank you very much! –  Mappan May 14 '13 at 11:07
1  
No, you could put for example 5 objects in your expectedNews array. Then you could cast viewResult.Model to a NewsItem[] and ensure that it contains 3 elements and that those 3 elements are the first 3 elements of the expectedNews array. This assumes of course that your repository is no longer performing the .Take(3) call but you are doing this inside the controller action which is the correct thing to do. –  Darin Dimitrov May 14 '13 at 16:05

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