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I'm making a simple device driver capable of receiving and sending characters using a UART.

My read and write functions are as follows:

unsigned char UART_read(void){
     unsigned int buf;
     while( ( ( inb(UART_LSR + UART) ) & UART_LSR_DR ) == 0 ){
             schedule();
     }
     buf = inb(UART);
     return (char)buf;
}

ssize_t serp_read(struct file *filep, char __user *buf, size_t count, loff_t *offp){
        ssize_t cnt, ret;
        char *buffer;
        unsigned char data;
        int i;

        buffer = kmalloc(count * sizeof(char), GFP_KERNEL);

        printk("\nTHIS IS KERNEL, read was called and count is %zd\n", count);

        while(1){        
           buffer[i] = UART_read();
           if(buffer[i] == '\n') break;
           i++;
        }

        buffer[strlen(buffer) - 1] = '\0';

        if( (cnt = (copy_to_user(buf, buffer, strlen(buffer)))) != 0 )
               printk("Error in copy_to_user() cnt is %d\n", cnt);

        ret = strlen(buffer);

        printk("\nTHIS IS KERNEL, read is going away and buf is %s\n", buf);

        return ret; 
}

void UART_send(unsigned char data){
       while( ( ( inb(UART_LSR + UART) ) & UART_LSR_THRE ) == 0 ){
             schedule();
       }
       outb(data, (UART + UART_TX));
}

ssize_t serp_write (struct file *filp, const char __user *buf, size_t count, loff_t *f_pos){
        ssize_t cnt, ret;
        int i;
        char *buffer;

        buffer = kmalloc(count * sizeof(char), GFP_KERNEL);

        if( (cnt = (copy_from_user(buffer, buf, count))) != 0 ) printk("Error in     copy_from_user()\n");
        buffer[count] = '\0';

        for(i = 0; i < strlen(buffer); i++){
            UART_send(buffer[i]);
        }

        ret = strlen(buffer);

        return ret; 
}

And part of the program I'm using to test is:

    char *str = "HELLO MY NAME IS";
    strcpy(buffer, str);
    printf("\nThe message is [ %s ]\n", buffer);
    if ( (write(fd, buffer, strlen(buffer))) < 0) perror("Error");

    buffer[0] = '\0';

    if ( (read(fd, buffer, sizeof(buffer))) < 0) perror("Error");

    //buffer[strlen(buffer)] = '\0';

    printf("\nThe content of buffer after read() is [ %s ]\n", buffer);

With what I have, I have no issues writing the "HELLO, MY NAME IS" string, but when I read, let's say "hey" from the UART, the buf in the read function appears as "heyLO, MY NAME IS", and I don't understand why this overwrite is happening. My best guess right now is that first I write to user space, which the kernel accesses, and then I read to that same user space, and ends up overwriting what's already there.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

read returns the number of bytes read, and doesn't nul-terminate. Further, this line:

buffer[strlen(buffer)] = '\0';

does nothing, because the strlen of buffer is the offset of the first '\0'! Try

ssize_t rb = read(fd, buffer, sizeof(buffer));
if ( rb < 0)
    perror("Error");
else {
    buffer[rb] = '\0';
    ...

Re-reading serp_read as well, I see this broken use of strlen is everywhere. If you don't have a nul-terminated C string already, you cannot use strlen. It just looks for the nul!

ssize_t serp_read(struct file *filep,
                  char __user *buf, size_t count, loff_t *offp) {
    ssize_t cnt, i;
    char *buffer;

    buffer = kmalloc(count, GFP_KERNEL);
    printk("\nTHIS IS KERNEL, read was called and count is %zd\n", count);

    /* your while loop started with i uninitialized,
     * and didn't check for overflow */
    for (i = 0; i != count; ++i) {
        buffer[i] = UART_read();
        if(buffer[i] == '\n')
            break;
    }
    /* this is incorrect because:
     * 1. strlen isn't useable unless the buffer is already nul-terminated
     * 2. the read(2) system call isn't expected to nul-terminate buffers anyway
    buffer[strlen(buffer) - 1] = '\0';
     */

    /* Use i+1 as the length if you want to include the newline */
    cnt = copy_to_user(buf, buffer, i);
    kfree(buffer);
    if(cnt) {
        printk("Error in copy_to_user() cnt is %d\n", cnt);
        i -= cnt; /* bytes successfully copied */
    }

    printk("\nTHIS IS KERNEL, read is going away and buf is %.*s\n", i, buf);
    /* this is how to print non-nul-terminated variable-length strings */

    return i; /* NB. should return an error above, as well as printing */ 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so in this case, with your code, since I return strlen(buffer) in the read function, I would be able to trim the buffer, removing the extra characters resulting from overwriting and get the result I want. I can't test the solution right now, but even assuming it works, is the overwriting supposed to happen to the user space, or am I doing something wrong in the program? –  user2170647 May 14 '13 at 11:41
    
in serp_read, you could just do buffer[i] = '\0'. Remember strlen doesn't do anything magical except look for the first nul. If you didn't put a nul there, it isn't even defined behaviour. –  Useless May 14 '13 at 11:44
    
I don't see how doing that would help me in this situation. If I read from the UART and print the buffer, it prints what I wrote and it gets me the correct lenght. The problem seems to occur to buf after I use copy_to_user(). –  user2170647 May 14 '13 at 11:56
    
It may be the kmalloc'd buffer is zero filled, in which case it would seem to work. The logic's still broken though. BTW, you're also leaking that kernel buffer. –  Useless May 14 '13 at 12:05
    
Looking at that code you posted, I have a question. Can I nul-terminate buffer after the for and then use copy_to_user() and print buf as a nul-terminated string? And how would I go about so solve the leaking? –  user2170647 May 14 '13 at 12:08

Use a memset, you are not clearing the memory

char *str = "HELLO MY NAME IS";

strcpy(buffer, str);
printf("\nThe message is [ %s ]\n", buffer);

if ( (write(fd, buffer, strlen(buffer))) < 0) perror("Error");

buffer[0] = '\0'; // this is clearing only single character
memset( buffer , 0 , sizeof(buffer)); // clear the entire buffer here

if ( (read(fd, buffer, sizeof(buffer))) < 0) perror("Error");

//buffer[strlen(buffer)] = '\0';

printf("\nThe content of buffer after read() is [ %s ]\n", buffer);
share|improve this answer
    
I see, thank you. –  user2170647 May 14 '13 at 12:42

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