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in some code I maintain there's XML parsing using minidom library.

For the XML structure similar to the below:

<a val="a1">
  <b val="b1">
    <c val="c1">
      Data
    </c>
  </b>
</a>

Code looks like:

for a in doc.getElementsByTagName("a"):
    aId = a.getAttribute("val").encode('ascii')
    if aId == aExpected:
        aFound = a
        break
else: # not found
    raise Exception("No A '%s' found" % aExpected)
for b in aFound.getElementsByTagName("b"):
    bId = b.getAttribute("val").encode('ascii')
    if bId == bExpected:
        bFound = b
        break
else: # not found
    raise Exception("No B '%s' found" % bExpected)
# similar for c

I wanted to use XPath to look for the data. I can do that with (ElementTree):

root.findall(".//a[@val=%s]/b[@val=%s]/c[@val=%s]" % (aExpected, bExpected, cExpected))

The code looks much nicer now. But, when no data can be found in XML, findall() returns None and I have to manually analyze file for first non-matching element.

Is there any possibility in ElementTree (or other XML API) to both use XPath and have XPath returning first point of matching failure (similarly to else clauses in original code)?

As pointed in one answer, the code may be substituted with:

aFound = root.find(".//a[@val=%r]" % (aExpected,))
if not aFound:
    raise("A not present")
bFound = aFound.find("b[@val=%r]" % (bExpected,))
if not bFound:
    raise("B not present")
cFound = bFound.find("c[@val=%r]" % (cExpected,))
if not cFound:
    raise("C not present")

Yes, that's definitely cleaner than the original, but I was looking for a library, which would give that info to me.

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2 Answers 2

For following xml

    <a val="a1">
  <b val="b1">
    <c val="c1">
      Data
    </c>
  </b>
</a>

Works this code

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET

file = "sample.xml"
aExpected = "a1"
bExpected = "b1"
cExpected = "c1"

tree = ET.parse(file)
root = tree.getroot()

bFound = root.find("./b[@val='" + bExpected + "']")
cFound = root.find(".//c[@val='" + cExpected + "']")

print(root)
print(bFound)
print(cFound)

Output is:

<Element 'a' at 0x02919B10>
<Element 'b' at 0x02919BD0>
<Element 'c' at 0x02919C30>

The xml.etree.ElementTree do not find anything by XPath becouse a is root element

If you want find the a element modify the xml in following way

  <root>
<a val="a1">
  <b val="b1">
    <c val="c1">
      Data
    </c>
  </b>
</a>
</root>

and code

 import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET

file = "sample.xml"
aExpected = "a1"
bExpected = "b1"
cExpected = "c1"

tree = ET.parse(file)
root = tree.getroot()

aFound = root.find("./a[@val='" + aExpected + "']")
bFound = root.find(".//b[@val='" + bExpected + "']")
cFound = root.find(".//c[@val='" + cExpected + "']")

print(aFound)
print(bFound)
print(cFound)

The result will be

<Element 'a' at 0x02919B10>
<Element 'b' at 0x02919BD0>
<Element 'c' at 0x02919C30>

Best regards

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aFound = root.findall(".//a[@val=%r]" % (aExpected,))[0]
bFound = aFound.findall("b[@val=%r]" % (bExpected,))[0]
cFound = bFound.findall("c[@val=%r]" % (cExpected,))[0]

An IndexError will be raise on the first line that finds no Elements.


Or, to avoid finding all the Elements when you only want one, use find:

aFound = root.find(".//a[@val=%r]" % (aExpected,))
bFound = aFound.find("b[@val=%r]" % (bExpected,))
cFound = bFound.find("c[@val=%r]" % (cExpected,))

Now an AttributeError (since NoneType has no find method) will be raised on the line after the one where no Element was found.

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