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I trying to use the multiprocessing package in python with a Pool.

I have the function f which is called by the map_async function:

from multiprocessing import Pool

def f(host, x):
    print host
    print x

hosts = ['1.1.1.1', '2.2.2.2']
pool = Pool(processes=5)
pool.map_async(f,hosts,"test")
pool.close()
pool.join()

This code has the next error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "pool-test.py", line 9, in <module>
    pool.map_async(f,hosts,"test")
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/multiprocessing/pool.py", line 290, in map_async
    result = MapResult(self._cache, chunksize, len(iterable), callback)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/multiprocessing/pool.py", line 557, in __init__
    self._number_left = length//chunksize + bool(length % chunksize)
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for //: 'int' and 'str'

I don't know how to pass more than 1 argument to the f function. Are there any way?

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1 Answer

"test" is interpreted as map_async's chunksize keyword argument (see the docs).

Your code should probably be (here copy-pasted from my IPython session) :

from multiprocessing import Pool

def f(arg):
    host, x = arg
    print host
    print x

hosts = ['1.1.1.1', '2.2.2.2']
args = ((host, "test") for host in hosts)
pool = Pool(processes=5)
pool.map_async(f, args)
pool.close()
pool.join()
## -- End pasted text --

1.1.1.1
test
2.2.2.2
test

Note: In Python 3 you can use starmap, which will unpack the arguments from the tuples. You'll be able to avoid doing host, x = arg explicitely.

share|improve this answer
    
I tested it but the result is not good; it print both hosts but only the "t" and the "e" of the "test" word. –  snake May 14 '13 at 11:56
    
Weird. It definitely does not do that on my computer. See update for my results -- I copy-pasted and checked them again. –  F.X. May 14 '13 at 12:40
    
With x=["test","test"] it works but it has no sense because imagine that the hosts list is about 10000 and I only want one x for compare the results. It not viable to have an x list with 10000 entries with the same result. Anyway, thanks. –  snake May 14 '13 at 14:05
    
That was just a quick'n'dirty way of doing it in your simple example. Maybe see the updated version? –  F.X. May 14 '13 at 14:33
1  
Finally I used a global option. Really is a static variable. –  snake May 16 '13 at 16:50
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