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In an existing app I have an activity with an inner class which extends AsyncTask, this looks like the following:

public class Activity_1 extends BaseActivity {
    ....
    new async().execute();
    ...

    public class asyncextends AsyncTask<Void, Void, String> {
        protected String doInBackground(Void... progress) { ... }
        protected void onPreExecute() { ... }
        protected void onPostExecute(String result) { ... }
    }
}

Now, I need to call the same doInBackground-method from another activity, but the onPostExecute() of the this inner class operates on some local UI variables and hence it's not possible to use it from outside the clas. Is there any way I can call this AsyncTask, and just override the onPostExecute andonPreExecute-method, or shall I create yet another inner-class in the other activity, do the same background thing (of course move it to common utility-class or something), etc...?

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What about such solution –  Adil Soomro May 14 '13 at 13:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can make a separate abstract package private class, extending AsyncTask and implementing doInBackground() method:

abstract class MyAsyncTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, String> {
    @Override
    final protected String doInBackground(Void... progress) { 
        // do stuff, common to both activities in here
    }
}

And in your activities just inherit from MyAsyncTask (new class probably should be private, by the way), implementing onPostExecute() and onPreExecute() methods:

public class Activity_1 extends BaseActivity {

    ...
    new Async1().execute();
    ...

    private class Async1 extends MyAsyncTask {
        @Override
        protected void onPreExecute(){ 
            // Activity 1 GUI stuff
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
            // Activity 1 GUI stuff
        }
    }
}

If onPreExecute and onPostExecute contain some common actions as well, you can apply the following pattern:

abstract class MyAsyncTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, String> {
    public interface MyAsyncTaskListener {
       void onPreExecuteConcluded();
       void onPostExecuteConcluded(String result);  
    }

    private MyAsyncTaskListener mListener;

    final public void setListener(MyAsyncTaskListener listener) {
       mListener = listener;
    }

    @Override
    final protected String doInBackground(Void... progress) { 
        // do stuff, common to both activities in here
    }

    @Override
    final protected void onPreExecute() {
        // common stuff
        ...
        if (mListener != null) 
            mListener.onPreExecuteConcluded();
    }

    @Override
    final protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
        // common stuff
        ...
        if (mListener != null) 
            mListener.onPostExecuteConcluded(result);
    }
}

and use it in your activity as following:

public class Activity_1 extends BaseActivity {

    ...
    MyAsyncTask aTask = new MyAsyncTask();
    aTask.setListener(new MyAsyncTask.MyAsyncTaskListener() {
       @Override
       void onPreExecuteConcluded() {
           // gui stuff
       }

       @Override
       void onPostExecuteConcluded(String result) {
           // gui stuff
       }
    });
    aTask.execute();
    ...
}    

You can also have your Activity implement MyAsyncTaskListener as well:

public class Activity_1 extends BaseActivity implements MyAsyncTask.MyAsyncTaskListener {
    @Override
    void onPreExecuteConcluded() {
        // gui stuff
    }

    @Override
    void onPostExecuteConcluded(String result) {
       // gui stuff
    }

    ...
    MyAsyncTask aTask = new MyAsyncTask();
    aTask.setListener(this);
    aTask.execute();
    ...

}

I wrote the code from the head, so it might contain errors, but it should illustrate the idea.

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Exactly something like this I was looking for. Will try to implement it first thing tomorrow morning. –  perene May 14 '13 at 19:50
    
Worked like a charm. Thanks! –  perene May 15 '13 at 13:20
    
Great answer! But I can't work out why I'm getting the following for MyAsyncTask aTask = new MyAsyncTask(); Cannot instantiate the type MySyncTask Any help would be greatly appreciated! –  Smittey Mar 17 '14 at 19:29
    
@Smittey must be a copy-paste error - the second implementation of MyAsyncTask shouldn't be abstract –  Vladimir Mar 17 '14 at 19:37
    
Thanks @Vladimir –  Smittey Mar 18 '14 at 13:40

Its so simple just Simply build an object of main class and than call the inner class like this

 OuterMainClass outer = new OuterMainClass();
       outer.new InnerAsyncClass(param)
         .execute();

this answer is too late to help you but hope it help others.

Thanks

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thanks really helped me... :) –  Aiyaz Parmar Apr 29 at 13:59
    
Glad it helped someone :) –  Syeda Zunairah Apr 30 at 4:58
    
hey can you do me a favor.. it worked really fine but now i have to return value to caller class and how should i do that..? i called Asynctask class from another class . so i want to get result of asyncTask in that caller class. do you know anyway to how to do it.? thanks :) –  Aiyaz Parmar Apr 30 at 6:12
    
Call a method of your caller class from onPostExecute() method of Asynctask –  Syeda Zunairah Apr 30 at 6:31
1  
make a static object thn pass it different values from different classes and onPostExc.. method check the value of that variable in onPostEx.. method, from there you get to know that which class called it thn simply from "if" statements call the appropriate method. –  Syeda Zunairah Apr 30 at 6:59

If we create one static method which is in one class and and will be execute in any class in doInBackground of AsyncTask we can easily update UI through same class and even in different class .

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