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I have an update statement which I am parsing with SQL::Parser

uPdate scott.emp 
set ename='SCT%',emp_date=TO_DATE('04/16/2011 00:00:00', 'MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS'),empno='15645' 
WHERE dept=20 and ename IN(select ename from emp where empno='1111');

But since TO_DATE function cannot be parsed with SQL::Parser hence it throws error:

Incomplete SET clause! at ./post_audit.pl line 173
Incomplete SET clause! at ./post_audit.pl line 173

How do I catch such errors? Does eval do the trick? Did not find proper documentation for the same.

Code to parse the SQL statements:

   +12  use SQL::Parser;

   +34  my $statement = "uPdate scott.emp set ename='SCT%',emp_date=TO_DATE('04/16/2011 00:00:00', 'MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS'),empno='15645' WHERE dept=20 and ename IN(select ename from emp where empno='1111')";

  +172      my $parser = SQL::Parser->new('AnyData', {RaiseError=>1} );
  +173      $parser->parse($statement);

Error is thrown at line 173 while parsing the statement.

share|improve this question

I don't think that "TO_DATE" function is the source of your error.

The source code to SQL::Parser module says:

my @sets = split /,/,$set_string;
my(@cols,@vals);
for(@sets) {
    my($col,$val) = split / = /,$_;
    return $self->do_err('Incomplete SET clause!') if !$col or !$val;

Note the "=" is surrounded by spaces in the regex: "/ = /"

Therefore, you should space-surround your equals signs:

set ename='SCT%'

should be

set ename = 'SCT%'

etc...


As far as handling it, it depends on which error flags you set in the constructor:

    sub do_err {
        ...
        warn $err if $self->{"PrintError"};
        die if $self->{"RaiseError"};
        return undef;
    }
  • If you set RaiseError flag, the code will die.

    my $parser = SQL::Parser->new('AnyData', {RaiseError=>1} );
    

    As such, you need to wrap an eval {} around the $parser->parse() call, and check $@ value for error string.

  • If you set PrintError flag, it will warn you. You can catch warnings by trapping a warning signal, as shown here on SO or on PerlMaven.

  • If you don't set either one, you get "false" return value from parse() but no idea of what the error was.

This is covered in parse()'s POD if you check it:

In addition to checking the return value of parse() with a variable like $success, you may use the PrintError and RaiseError attributes as you would in a DBI script:

  • If PrintError is true, then SQL syntax errors will be sent as warnings to STDERR (i.e. to the screen or to a file if STDERR has been redirected). This is set to true by default which means that unless you specifically turn it off, all errors will be reported.

  • If RaiseError is true, then SQL syntax errors will cause the script to die, (i.e. the script will terminate unless wrapped in an eval). This is set to false by default which means that unless you specifically turn it on, scripts will continue to operate even if there are SQL syntax errors.

share|improve this answer
    
As a side note, this sounds as a really dodgy way to parse SQL. What if there's a comma or " = " present in a string literal in SQL? – DVK May 14 '13 at 14:10
    
DVK - The question is not whether my SQL is proper to parse, the question is how do I catch such SQLs and print an error message if any improper SQL is parsed. – contravaluebets May 15 '13 at 10:36
    
By the way the problem is due to TO_DATE function only. When I parse the following SQL, it passes: codeuPdate scott.emp set ename='SCT%',emp_date='04/16/2011', empno='15645' WHERE dept=20 and ename IN(select ename f rom emp where empno='1111');code – contravaluebets May 15 '13 at 10:44
    
@Somenath - see update. – DVK May 15 '13 at 13:55

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