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I am trying to use List< int> as SQL parameter using this code:

var listID= new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

        using (var sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(_connectionstring))
        {
            using (var cmd = new SqlCommand())
            {
                cmd.Connection = sqlConnection;
                cmd.CommandText = "delete from MyTable where TableID in ( @tableID)";

                string param = String.Join(",", listID.ToArray());
                cmd.Parameters.Add("@tableID", param);
                sqlConnection.Open();
                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
            sqlConnection.Close();
        }

The problem is, that this code will generate:

exec sp_executesql N'delete from MyTable where TableID in ( @tableID)',N'@tableID nvarchar(17)',@tableID =N'1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9'

This will fail because:

Conversion failed when converting the nvarchar value '1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9' to data type int.

Any idea how to solve this? Thank you.

EDIT: I'm using MS SQL 2012

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marked as duplicate by Andreas Niedermair, George Duckett, RandomSeed, Patrick McDonald, Jesse May 15 '13 at 15:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
is it SQL server, if so, what version? –  Jodrell May 14 '13 at 14:47
    
yes sorry, it's sql server 2012. I will extend my question. –  Chatumbabub May 14 '13 at 14:50
1  
There is a logical difference between multiple parameters, separated by commas, and a single string parameter that happens to contain commas. T-SQL (like every other sane language) doesn't attempt to rip apart that single parameter. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 14 '13 at 14:54
    
are you sure that IN will work with one parameter? (i mean: one to rule them all, not one for one ...) –  Andreas Niedermair May 14 '13 at 14:54
1  
check this questions: stackoverflow.com/questions/182060/where-in-array-of-ids –  VeNoMiS May 14 '13 at 14:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You should use a TVP, than you can keep the query exactly as specified. They were introduced in SQL 2008.

Table Valued Parameter, with example

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2  
given that the OP is talking about SQL2012, this is the way to go. +1 –  Jodrell May 14 '13 at 15:06
    
+1 Yep. Agreed. When I wrote my answer, we didn't know which version of SQL he was talking about. –  Tom Chantler May 14 '13 at 15:11

In SQL Server 2005 I wrote a CLR function that converts a comma delimited list into a set of nvarchars.

[SqlFunction(DataAccess = DataAccessKind.None,
                IsDeterministic = true,
                SystemDataAccess = SystemDataAccesskind.None,
                IsPrecise = true,
                FillRowMethodName = "SplitFillRow",
                TableDefinition = "s NVARCHAR(MAX)")]
public static IEnumerable Split(SqlChars seperator, SqlString s)
{
    if (s.IsNull)
    {
        return new string[0];
    }

    return s.ToString().Split(seperator.Buffer);
}

public static void SplitFillRow(object row, out SqlString s)
{
    s = new SqlString(row.ToString());
}

Which I think is an effective use .Net CLR and superior to the non CLR alternative using a CTE function.


In SQL Server 2008+, you can use Table Valued Parameters.

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I would generally use some kind of ORM, but if you want to carry on with something similar to what you've got, you could always try this:

    var listID= new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
    using (var sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(_connectionstring))
    {
        using (var cmd = new SqlCommand())
        {
            cmd.Connection = sqlConnection;
            cmd.CommandText = "delete from MyTable where TableID in (" + String.Join(",",listID) + ")";
            sqlConnection.Open();
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
        sqlConnection.Close();
    }
share|improve this answer
2  
Why was this downvoted? Seems reasonable given the problem. –  Michael Todd May 14 '13 at 14:57
1  
If you are doing dynamic SQL its suprisingly effective. –  Jodrell May 14 '13 at 15:03
3  
@MichaelTodd I'm guessing because even though it's safe in its current form, trivial modifications (List<string>) make it dangerously unsafe. Personally, I'm not necessarily opposed to dynamic SQL, but if it needs to be used, a probably generally better alternative would be to build a where TableID in (@p0, @p1, @p2, ...) query and store the list values in the parameters. –  hvd May 14 '13 at 15:04
1  
@hvd I'm aware of SQL injection, but I'm unclear how this particular use of dynamic SQL could be unsafe. What trivial modification would allow a list of ints to alter the SQL sufficiently to become a problem? (If you mean that, at some later time, the list is turned into strings, then YES, of course it would be a problem.) –  Michael Todd May 14 '13 at 15:46
    
@MichaelTodd Right, exactly that: changing List<int> to List<string> in order to use it on a different table where the primary key is a string instead of an integer is, IMO, a trivial modification. I think we're mostly in agreement: SQL injection is not possible if you're only dealing with ints and you're not preceding the ints by anything that could combine with the sign of negative values. –  hvd May 14 '13 at 15:57

In SQL Server 2008 and above, you can use table value parameters. Since they are just comman seperated integers, I would also try to keep delete statement in stored procedure and pass xml string or pass as is to get parsed into into table variable. It is doable in many ways, as mentioned in other answers, table value parameters seems clean.

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Don't use XML for this. This is exactly what TVP's are for. The TVP can be sent as a parameter to the sproc, too –  Matthew May 14 '13 at 15:00
    
You're right, tvp seems clean. But having only comma separated integers made me provide additional options. In < SQL Server 2005, I would prefer using XML rather than CLR function. –  Sunny May 14 '13 at 15:06

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