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I keep beating myself over the head with this. I have an SSE-based algorithm for multiplying matrix A by matrix B. I need to also implement the operations for where A, B, or both are transposed. I did a naive implementation of it, the 4x4 matrix code represented below (which is pretty standard SSE operations, I think), but the A*B^T operation takes about as twice as long as A*B. The ATLAS implementation returns similar values for A*B, and nearly identical results for multiplying by a transpose, which suggests to me that there is an efficient way to do this.

MM-Multiplication:

m1 = (mat1.m_>>2)<<2;
n2 = (mat2.n_>>2)<<2;
n  = (mat1.n_>>2)<<2;

for (k=0; k<n; k+=4) {
  for (i=0; i<m1; i+=4) {
    // fetch: get 4x4 matrix from mat1
    // row-major storage, so get 4 rows
    Float* a0 = mat1.el_[i]+k;
    Float* a1 = mat1.el_[i+1]+k;
    Float* a2 = mat1.el_[i+2]+k;
    Float* a3 = mat1.el_[i+3]+k;

    for (j=0; j<n2; j+=4) {
      // fetch: get 4x4 matrix from mat2
      // row-major storage, so get 4 rows
      Float* b0 = mat2.el_[k]+j;
      Float* b1 = mat2.el_[k+1]+j;
      Float* b2 = mat2.el_[k+2]+j;
      Float* b3 = mat2.el_[k+3]+j;

      __m128 b0r = _mm_loadu_ps(b0);
      __m128 b1r = _mm_loadu_ps(b1);
      __m128 b2r = _mm_loadu_ps(b2);
      __m128 b3r = _mm_loadu_ps(b3);

      {  // first row of result += first row of mat1 * 4x4 of mat2
        __m128 cX1 = _mm_add_ps(_mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a0+0), b0r), _mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a0+1), b1r));
        __m128 cX2 = _mm_add_ps(_mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a0+2), b2r), _mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a0+3), b3r));
        Float* c0 = this->el_[i]+j;
        _mm_storeu_ps(c0, _mm_add_ps(_mm_add_ps(cX1, cX2), _mm_loadu_ps(c0)));
      }

      { // second row of result += second row of mat1 * 4x4 of mat2
        __m128 cX1 = _mm_add_ps(_mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a1+0), b0r), _mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a1+1), b1r));
        __m128 cX2 = _mm_add_ps(_mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a1+2), b2r), _mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a1+3), b3r));
        Float* c1 = this->el_[i+1]+j;
        _mm_storeu_ps(c1, _mm_add_ps(_mm_add_ps(cX1, cX2), _mm_loadu_ps(c1)));
      }

      { // third row of result += third row of mat1 * 4x4 of mat2
        __m128 cX1 = _mm_add_ps(_mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a2+0), b0r), _mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a2+1), b1r));
        __m128 cX2 = _mm_add_ps(_mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a2+2), b2r), _mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a2+3), b3r));
        Float* c2 = this->el_[i+2]+j;
        _mm_storeu_ps(c2, _mm_add_ps(_mm_add_ps(cX1, cX2), _mm_loadu_ps(c2)));
      }

      { // fourth row of result += fourth row of mat1 * 4x4 of mat2
        __m128 cX1 = _mm_add_ps(_mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a3+0), b0r), _mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a3+1), b1r));
        __m128 cX2 = _mm_add_ps(_mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a3+2), b2r), _mm_mul_ps(_mm_load_ps1(a3+3), b3r));
        Float* c3 = this->el_[i+3]+j;
        _mm_storeu_ps(c3, _mm_add_ps(_mm_add_ps(cX1, cX2), _mm_loadu_ps(c3)));
      }
  }
// Code omitted to handle remaining rows and columns
}

For the MT multiplication (matrix multiplied by transpose matrix), I stead stored b0r to b3r with the following commands and changed the loop variables appropriately:

__m128 b0r = _mm_set_ps(b3[0], b2[0], b1[0], b0[0]);
__m128 b1r = _mm_set_ps(b3[1], b2[1], b1[1], b0[1]);
__m128 b2r = _mm_set_ps(b3[2], b2[2], b1[2], b0[2]);
__m128 b3r = _mm_set_ps(b3[3], b2[3], b1[3], b0[3]);

I suspect that the slowdown is partly due to the difference between pulling in a row at a time and having to store 4 values each time to get the column, but I feel like the other way of going about this, pulling in rows of B and then multiplying by the column of As, will just shift the cost over to storing 4 columns of results.

I have also tried pulling in B's rows as rows and then using _MM_TRANSPOSE4_PS(b0r, b1r, b2r, b3r); to do the transposition (I thought there might be some additional optimizations in that macro), but there's no real improvement.

On the surface, I feel like this should be faster... the dot products involved would be a row by a row, which seems inherently more efficient, but trying to do the dot products straight up just results in having to do the same thing to store the results.

What am I missing here?

Added: Just to clarify, I'm trying to not transpose the matrices. I'd prefer to iterate along them. The problem, as best I can tell, is that the _mm_set_ps command is much slower than _mm_load_ps.

I also tried a variation where I stored the 4 rows of the A matrix and then replaced the 4 curly-bracketed segments containing 1 load, 4 multiplies, and 2 adds with 4 multiply instructions and 3 hadds, but to little avail. The timing stays the same (and yes, I tried it with a debug statement to verify that the code had changed in my test compile. Said debug statement was removed before profiling, of course):

    {  // first row of result += first row of mat1 * 4x4 of mat2
      __m128 cX1 = _mm_hadd_ps(_mm_mul_ps(a0r, b0r), _mm_mul_ps(a0r, b1r));
      __m128 cX2 = _mm_hadd_ps(_mm_mul_ps(a0r, b2r), _mm_mul_ps(a0r, b3r));
      Float* c0 = this->el_[i]+j;
      _mm_storeu_ps(c0, _mm_add_ps(_mm_hadd_ps(cX1, cX2), _mm_loadu_ps(c0)));
    }

    { // second row of result += second row of mat1 * 4x4 of mat2
      __m128 cX1 = _mm_hadd_ps(_mm_mul_ps(a1r, b0r), _mm_mul_ps(a1r, b1r));
      __m128 cX2 = _mm_hadd_ps(_mm_mul_ps(a1r, b2r), _mm_mul_ps(a1r, b3r));
      Float* c0 = this->el_[i+1]+j;
      _mm_storeu_ps(c0, _mm_add_ps(_mm_hadd_ps(cX1, cX2), _mm_loadu_ps(c0)));
    }

    { // third row of result += third row of mat1 * 4x4 of mat2
      __m128 cX1 = _mm_hadd_ps(_mm_mul_ps(a2r, b0r), _mm_mul_ps(a2r, b1r));
      __m128 cX2 = _mm_hadd_ps(_mm_mul_ps(a2r, b2r), _mm_mul_ps(a2r, b3r));
      Float* c0 = this->el_[i+2]+j;
      _mm_storeu_ps(c0, _mm_add_ps(_mm_hadd_ps(cX1, cX2), _mm_loadu_ps(c0)));
    }

    { // fourth row of result += fourth row of mat1 * 4x4 of mat2
      __m128 cX1 = _mm_hadd_ps(_mm_mul_ps(a3r, b0r), _mm_mul_ps(a3r, b1r));
      __m128 cX2 = _mm_hadd_ps(_mm_mul_ps(a3r, b2r), _mm_mul_ps(a3r, b3r));
      Float* c0 = this->el_[i+3]+j;
      _mm_storeu_ps(c0, _mm_add_ps(_mm_hadd_ps(cX1, cX2), _mm_loadu_ps(c0)));
    }

Update: Right, and moving the loading of the rows of a0r to a3r into the curly braces in an attempt to avoid register thrashing failed as well.

share|improve this question
1  
Do you realize that you dont need really transpose the matrix but just access it in a different way? –  olivecoder May 14 '13 at 17:00
1  
It looks like you are actually transposing your matrix? Of course that would be slower. –  RandyGaul May 14 '13 at 17:34
    
Actually, I am trying to do it in-place by accessing the items in a different order. I tried it with an in-place transpose and got approximately the same timing. –  Sean Duggan May 14 '13 at 17:39
    
Don't use the hadd instruction. Stick to vertical add. –  user2088790 May 15 '13 at 9:48
    
Actually, I think I'm wrong about that. See my answer. –  user2088790 May 15 '13 at 13:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this is one few cases where horizontal add is useful. You want C = A*B^T but B is not stored in memory as the transpose. That's the problem. It's store like an AoS instead of a SoA. In this case taking the transpose of B and doing vertical add is slower than using horizontal add I think. This is at least true for Matrix*vector Efficient 4x4 matrix vector multiplication with SSE: horizontal add and dot product - what's the point?. In the code below the function m4x4 is non SSE 4x4 matrix-product, m4x4_vec uses SSE, m4x4T does C=A*B^T without SSE, and m4x4T_vec does C=A*B^T usisg SSE. The last one is the one you want I think.

Note: for larger matrices I would not use this method. In that case it's faster to take the transpose first and use vertical add (with SSE/AVX you do something more complicated, you transpose strips with the SSE/AVX width). That's because the transpose goes as O(n^2) and the matrix product goes as O(n^3) so for large matrices the transpose is insignificant. However, for 4x4 the transpose is significant so horizontal add wins.

Edit: I misunderstood what you wanted. You want C = (A*B)^T. That should be just as fast as (A*B) and the code is nearly the same you basically just swap the roles of A and B.
We can write the math as follows:

C = A*B in Einstein notation is C_i,j = A_i,k * B_k,j.  
Since (A*B)^T = B^T*A^T we can write 
C = (A*B)^T in Einstein notation is C_i,j = B^T_i,k * A^T_k,j = A_j,k * B_k,i

If you compare the two the only thing that changes is we swap the roles of j and i. I put some code to do this at the end of this answer.

#include "stdio.h"
#include <nmmintrin.h>    

void m4x4(const float *A, const float *B, float *C) {
    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
            float sum = 0.0f;
            for(int k=0; k<4; k++) {
                sum += A[i*4+k]*B[k*4+j];
            }
            C[i*4 + j] = sum;
        }
    }
}

void m4x4T(const float *A, const float *B, float *C) {
    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
            float sum = 0.0f;
            for(int k=0; k<4; k++) {
                sum += A[i*4+k]*B[j*4+k];
            }
            C[i*4 + j] = sum;
        }
    }
}

void m4x4_vec(const float *A, const float *B, float *C) {
    __m128 Brow[4], Mrow[4];
    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        Brow[i] = _mm_load_ps(&B[4*i]);
    }

    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        Mrow[i] = _mm_set1_ps(0.0f);
        for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
            __m128 a = _mm_set1_ps(A[4*i +j]);
            Mrow[i] = _mm_add_ps(Mrow[i], _mm_mul_ps(a, Brow[j]));
        }
    }
    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        _mm_store_ps(&C[4*i], Mrow[i]);
    }
}

void m4x4T_vec(const float *A, const float *B, float *C) {
    __m128 Arow[4], Brow[4], Mrow[4];
    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        Arow[i] = _mm_load_ps(&A[4*i]);
        Brow[i] = _mm_load_ps(&B[4*i]);
    }

    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        __m128 prod[4];
        for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
            prod[j] =  _mm_mul_ps(Arow[i], Brow[j]);
        }
        Mrow[i] = _mm_hadd_ps(_mm_hadd_ps(prod[0], prod[1]), _mm_hadd_ps(prod[2], prod[3]));    
    }
    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        _mm_store_ps(&C[4*i], Mrow[i]);
    }

}

float compare_4x4(const float* A, const float*B) {
    float diff = 0.0f;
    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
            diff += A[i*4 +j] - B[i*4+j];
            printf("A %f, B %f\n", A[i*4 +j], B[i*4 +j]);
        }
    }
    return diff;    
}

int main() {
    float *A = (float*)_mm_malloc(sizeof(float)*16,16);
    float *B = (float*)_mm_malloc(sizeof(float)*16,16);
    float *C1 = (float*)_mm_malloc(sizeof(float)*16,16);
    float *C2 = (float*)_mm_malloc(sizeof(float)*16,16);

    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
            A[i*4 +j] = i*4+j;
            B[i*4 +j] = i*4+j;
            C1[i*4 +j] = 0.0f;
            C2[i*4 +j] = 0.0f;
        }
    }
    m4x4T(A, B, C1);
    m4x4T_vec(A, B, C2);
    printf("compare %f\n", compare_4x4(C1,C2));

}

Edit:

Here is are the scalar and SSE function that do C = (A*B)^T. They should be just as fast as their A*B versions.

void m4x4TT(const float *A, const float *B, float *C) {
    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
            float sum = 0.0f;
            for(int k=0; k<4; k++) {
                sum += A[j*4+k]*B[k*4+i];
            }
            C[i*4 + j] = sum;
        }
    }
}

void m4x4TT_vec(const float *A, const float *B, float *C) {
    __m128 Arow[4], Crow[4];
    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        Arow[i] = _mm_load_ps(&A[4*i]);
    }

    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        Crow[i] = _mm_set1_ps(0.0f);
        for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
            __m128 a = _mm_set1_ps(B[4*i +j]);
            Crow[i] = _mm_add_ps(Crow[i], _mm_mul_ps(a, Arow[j]));
        }
    }

    for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
        _mm_store_ps(&C[4*i], Crow[i]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm currently exploring doing the transpose. My method is to loop through the 4x4 matrices, pulling in the 4 rows, using _MM_TRANSPOSE4_PS to transpose them, and then store them in the transposed position, then handling the outlying rows, then individual values (a lot like the multiplication algorithm I used above). I thank you for the example code. –  Sean Duggan May 15 '13 at 14:30
    
Great! Please let me know what you find. My guess is that using _MM_TRANSPOSE4_PS (which does a bunch of shuffles) along with vertical add will be slower than only using hadd but I could be wrong. –  user2088790 May 15 '13 at 14:52
    
BTW, I did not try further optimization to the code above such as loop unrolling, I would not be surprised if that helps. –  user2088790 May 15 '13 at 14:55
    
Doing the transpose first indeed brings speeds up to about the same value! Still tracking down something weird where the transpose multiplied by a transpose takes longer, even if I replace the call with one to mulMM (!) but it's definite progress. Thank you. –  Sean Duggan May 15 '13 at 19:17
    
I think I misunderstood what you meant. You wrote AB^T. so I thought you meant the transpose of B only. But you really mean (AB)^T? In that case I think you can use vertical add without doing any transpose at all so it should be just as fast as A*B. –  user2088790 May 15 '13 at 19:34

A few recommendations that may help:

  • Do not use unaligned memory (those _mm_loadu* are slow).
  • You are not accessing memory sequentally, which kills the cache. Try transposing the matrix before the actual access to that memory, this will let the CPU fetch and use the cache as much as possible. This way the following __m128 b0r = _mm_set_ps(b3[0], b2[0], b1[0], b0[0]); // and b1r, etc.. is not needed. The idea would be to grab the whole 4 components sequentially. If you need to reorganize your memory before the SSE code is called, do so.
  • You are loading in the inner loop this: _mm_load_ps1(a0+0) (the same for a1, a2 and a3) but is constant for all iterations in the inner loop. You can load those values outside and save some cycles. Keep an eye on what you can reuse from previous iteration.
  • Profile. use Intel VTune or something similar, it will tell you where is the bottleneck.
share|improve this answer
1  
One pedantic point. The _mm_loadu_ps intrinsic is only slow on unaligned memory. If you use it on aligned memory it's essentially as fast as _mm_load_ps. –  user2088790 May 15 '13 at 9:27
    
Good point there. –  Trax May 15 '13 at 9:44
    
Since I am very much the newbie when it comes to the memory alignment, before I go in and try to change the extant code, how does aligning the values like this affect memory consumption? –  Sean Duggan May 15 '13 at 15:02
    
Not sure what you mean, but SSE code requires data to be 16bytes aligned, otherwise the CPU needs to expend a few more cycles to fix resolve the memory address. is jsut a matter of allocating your matrices 16 bytes aligned. –  Trax May 15 '13 at 15:14
    
I was misunderstanding the situation. Long story short, I thought that was leaving empty space because I'd written the wrong number down for the same of the floats. –  Sean Duggan May 15 '13 at 15:42

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