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jQuery provides a isTrigger property which allows us to know if the event was a "real event" or was it only "triggered".

$(ele).on("click", function(e){
    if(e.isTrigger){
       // this event was only triggered, not a real event 
    }else{
      // this was a real event 
    }
}) 

For unit-testing purposes, is there a way to trigger a event and somehow overwrite the isTrigger property.. and in the event callback still behave (by having isTrigger === false) as if it was a real click event.. Was trying the following code:

var triggerClick = jQuery.Event("click", {
    isTrigger:false,
    data:{
        isTrigger:false
    }

but it doesn't seem to pass it correctly..

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about the native way, avoiding the jQuery isTrigger altogether:

function simulateClick(elem) {
  var evt = document.createEvent("MouseEvents");
  evt.initMouseEvent("click", true, true, elem,
          0, 0, 0, 0, 0, false, false, false, false, 0, null);
  if (document.createEvent) {
     elem.dispatchEvent(evt);
  } else {
     elem.fireEvent("on" + evt.eventType, evt); // support for IE crap
  }
}

To use it you'd just do:

$(ele).on("click", function(e){
    if(e.isTrigger){
       // this event was only triggered, not a real event 
       console.log('triggered');
    }else{
       // this was a real event 
       console.log('clicked');
    }
});

simulateClick(ele);

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer

If you are concerned about whether or not an event was trigger by the user or by code, perhaps you should extract a method and call that method directly. You can then add a userTriggered parameter and pass true or false.

$(ele).on("click", function(e){
    doWork($(this), e, true);
}

doWork($(ele), null, false);

function doWork(item, e, userTriggered)
{
    if(userTriggered) {
    }
    else {
    }
}

Then when you test your doWork method, you can pass in userTriggered as true or false to test the desired behavior. This also eliminates the dependency of browser behavior from your test, which is a good thing.

share|improve this answer
    
In general it is a good idea, but why over modularize code just for testing if it can be done in a better way for this sole purpose.. – adardesign May 19 '13 at 15:29
1  
I would argue that this method is clearer than simulating a user click. This removes the unnecessary triggering of an event handler and allows you to call the required functionality directly. Not only is it probably more efficient, but it is easier to read. – cadrell0 May 20 '13 at 13:21
    
I hear ya! Thanks anyway! – adardesign May 20 '13 at 14:36

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