Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to read from a file using file.get() but it seems to be stuck in the first line. Input file is like:

1234,56
7891,01
.......

This is my code:

char* n1 = new char[5];
char* n2 = new char[3];
std::ifstream data("input_file");
while (i < 4) {
    data.get(n1, 5);
    printf("%ld\n", data.gcount());
    data.get(n2, 3);
    printf("%ld\n", data.gcount());
    //read newline
    data.get(&ch, 2);
    printf("%ld\n", data.gcount());
    printf("n1= %s, n2 = %s\n", n1, n2+1);
}

Output:

0
0
0
n1= 1234, n2 = 56
0
0
0
n1= 1234, n2 = 56
0
0
0
n1= 1234, n2 = 56

I'm not able to make any sense of this.

share|improve this question
1  
How is ch defined ? My guess is that it's only a single character. –  Paul R May 14 '13 at 15:38
    
yes, you're right –  vivek May 14 '13 at 16:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

get(char*, streamsize) gets stuck as soon as it encounters newline delimiter. you need to use getline() to advance to the next line.

Also, your second get() only reads 2 characters from the stream (i.e you will read ",5" instead of ",56" for your first line.

share|improve this answer
    
But why does gcount() return zero always ? shouldn't it increase ? –  vivek May 14 '13 at 16:23
    
@vivek Yes, if it actually extracts something. Once it gets stuck on end-of-line, it won't extract anything. –  AlexK May 14 '13 at 17:28

There is one problem here:

data.get(&ch, 2);

assuming that you have defined ch somewhere earlier as

char ch;

The newline will be stored in ch but a terminating '\0' will be written at the next address beyond ch, corrupting whatever variable happens to reside there.

Change this to:

char ch[2];

data.get(ch, 2);
share|improve this answer
1  
True, but even after correcting this, he still won't get past the first line unless he either uses getline() or another form of get(). The delimiting character is not extracted from the input sequence if found, and remains there as the next character to be extracted from the stream (see getline for an alternative that does discard the delimiting character). –  AlexK May 14 '13 at 16:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.