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I'm trying to add a new route in my express app but I keep getting error when trying to start the server. The error is

C:\development\node\express_app\node_modules\express\lib\router\index.js:252
    throw new Error(msg);
          ^
Error: .get() requires callback functions but got a [object Undefined]

here are my files, I'm new to node so let me know if i left out an important file

routes/furniture.js

exports.furniture = function(req, res){
   res.render('furniture', { title: '4\267pli' });
};

routes/index.js

/*
 * GET home page.
 */

exports.index = function(req, res){
  res.render('index', { title: '4\267pli' });
};

views/furniture.ejs

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>4&middot;pli -- architecture</title>
    <link rel='stylesheet' href='/stylesheets/style.css'/>
    <link href='http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Didact+Gothic' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'>
</head>
<body>
<div class="wrapper">
    <h1 class="logo"><%= title %></h1>
</div>
</body>
</html>

app.js

/**
 * Module dependencies.
 */

var express = require('express')
  , routes = require('./routes')
  , user = require('./routes/user')
  , furniture = require('./routes/furniture')
  , http = require('http')
  , path = require('path');

var app = express();

// all environments
app.set('port', process.env.PORT || 3000);
app.set('views', __dirname + '/views');
app.set('view engine', 'ejs');
app.use(express.favicon());
app.use(express.logger('dev'));
app.use(express.bodyParser());
app.use(express.methodOverride());
app.use(app.router);
  app.use(require('stylus').middleware(__dirname + '/public'));
app.use(express.static(path.join(__dirname, 'public')));

// development only
if ('development' == app.get('env')) {
  app.use(express.errorHandler());
}

app.get('/', routes.index);
app.get('/users', user.list);
app.get('/furniture', routes.furniture);

http.createServer(app).listen(app.get('port'), function(){
  console.log('Express server listening on port ' + app.get('port'));
});
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The trouble is:

 routes = require('./routes'),
 user = require('./routes/user'),
 furniture = require('./routes/furniture'),

These 3 are setting your routes folders, not a specific file, express will look for a index.js ( not found, then --> error)

Inside these folders, you should put a index.js with your:

exports.xxxx =  function(req, res){
    res.render('xx', { foo: foo);
};

Then, your proyect should look like:

routes/
  ├── index.js
  │
  ├── user/
  │     └── index.js (with a exports.user inside)
  │   
  └── fourniture/
        └── index.js (with a exports.furniture inside)

You can add multiple export functions to a route like these:

app.js

// a folder called routes with the index.js file inside
routes = require('./routes')

.
.
.

app.get('/', routes.main_function);  
app.get('/sec_route', routes.sec_function);
app.post('/other_route', routes.other_function);

/routes/index.js

exports.main_function =  function(req, res){
    res.render('template1', { foo: foo });
};

exports.sec_function =  function(req, res){
    res.render('template2', { bar: bar });
};

exports.other_function =  function(req, res){
    res.render('template1', { baz: baz });
};
share|improve this answer
    
thanks works great –  Antarr Byrd May 14 '13 at 17:13
    
@3boll what if you wanted to have several functions under user... index.js admin.js and foo.js... how would you write that? –  Cmag Dec 2 '13 at 1:59
1  
@Clustermagnet check the code added to the response. –  jmingov Dec 2 '13 at 19:08
1  
it also seems that the user = require('./routes/user') can also relate to a user.js file that is held in the routes folder –  ebbflowgo Dec 16 '13 at 17:18

If your website is so big some times I prefer to do something like:

routes/furniture.js:

module.exports = function(app)
{
    app.get("/furniture/" function(req, res) {
        res.render('furniture', { title: '4\267pli' });
    });
}

And then in app.js:

require("./routes/furniture")(app);

It's mainly the same but app.js will be cleaner.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks i find this will be useful soon enough. –  Antarr Byrd May 15 '13 at 13:01
    
This is definitely a nice method as it actually keeps the HTTP routes themselves within the routes folder. –  Matt Fletcher Aug 22 '14 at 10:23

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