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It seems that the context $(this) changes during certain circumstances for a class selector. I spent a good number of hours trying to debug the below javascript, which I am not any good at:

$.fn.specialbutton = function(callback) {
    $(this).bind('click', function() { // $(this) is the a.button, as expected
        $.ajax({
            url: 'ajax.php',
            data: callback(); // context pitfall 
        }).done(function(response) {
            $(this).html(response); // context changed to something unknown
        })
    });
}

$('a.button').specialbutton(function() {
    // context pitfall 
    return {
        id: $(this).data('id'); // $(this) is not what you expect
    };
});

Eventually I figure the solution is to save the context and use explicit calling of the callback:

$.fn.specialbutton = function(callback) {
    $(this).bind('click', function() { // $(this) is the a.button, as expected

        var $this = $(this); // save the context;

        $.ajax({
            url: 'ajax.php',
            data: callback.call($this); // explicitly specify context
        }).done(function(response) {
            $this.html(response); // reuse the saved context
        })
    });
}

$('a.button').specialbutton(function() {
    // context pitfall 
    return {
        id: $(this).data('id'); // $(this) is what was specified in prototype
    };
});

What is the rule and reason for the change of context? Is this a design feature or limitation? This does not seem to affect if the selector was an HTML id selector i.e. $('a#button'). What would be a better or common way to code the above?

share|improve this question
    
The rule is, the context will change from place to place. That's a javascript thing not related to jQuery, and it depends on how each function is executed and/or where it is defined. For example, executing callback directly will execute it with the context it was defined in (which will be window), however using .call() of course changes the context to what you pass as the first parameter to .call(). Inside the ajax success handler, this refers to the context property of the ajax call, which by default is the options passed into $.ajax. That happens inside jQuery using .call(). – Kevin B May 14 '13 at 17:13
    
This is not an issue with how jQuery works, this is an issue with how JavaScript works. Every function has its own context (this). If you learn how context is handled in JavaScript, using the context with jQuery will make more sense as well. – zzzzBov May 14 '13 at 17:18
    
a good article alistapart.com/article/getoutbindingsituations – shakib May 14 '13 at 17:44
    
@Shakib if you write your comment as answer, I'll mark it – Jake May 15 '13 at 1:40
    
link only answers aren't very useful once said link dies – Kevin B May 15 '13 at 2:09
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since the mentioned article helped you with your answer, ill try to mention the key points from the article,

In JavaScript, binding is always explicit, and can easily be lost, so a method using this will not refer to the proper object in all situations, unless you force it to. Overall, binding in JavaScript is not a difficult concept, but it is far too often ignored or glossed over by JavaScripters, which leads to confusion.

example:

var john = {
  name: 'John',
  greet: function(person) {
    alert("Hi " + person + ", my name is " + this.name);
  }
};
john.greet("Mark");

//=> "Hi Mark, my name is John"

then again,

var john = {
  name: 'John',
  greet: function(person) {
    alert("Hi " + person + ", my name is " + this.name);
  }
};
var fx = john.greet;
fx("Mark");
// => "Hi Mark, my name is " 

This is the single most important issue with JavaScript binding—something I’ll refer to as “binding loss.” It happens whenever you’re accessing a method through a reference instead of directly through its owner object. The method loses its implicit binding, and this stops referencing its owner object and goes back to its default value, which in this case is window (so if window had a name property by then, it would be used).

Recognizing binding-sensitive code patterns

Binding-sensitive code patterns involve passing method references, which usually happens through two possible means: either you’re assigning a method as a value, or you’re passing a method as an argument (which is essentially the same thing, when you think about it).

Binding explicitly

So how do we fix it? We bind explicitly—that is, we explicitly state to what this will point to within the method when it gets called. And how do we do that? JavaScript provides us with two options: apply and call.

var fx = john.greet;
fx.apply(john, ["Mark"]);
// => "Hi Mark, my name is John" 

var fx = christophe.greet;
fx.call(christophe, "Mark");
// => "Hi Mark, my name is John"

So what we want is a way to persistently bind a method, so that we get a bound method reference, so to speak. The only way to achieve this requires us to wrap our original method in another one, that will perform the apply call. Here’s a stab at it:

function createBoundedWrapper(object, method) {
  return function() {
    return method.apply(object, arguments);
  };
}

var john = {
  name: 'John',
  greet: function(person) {
    alert("Hi " + person + ", my name is " + this.name);
  }
};
var fx = createBoundedWrapper(john, john.greet);

fx("Mark");
// => "Hi Mark, my name is John" 

If you’re not too keen on JavaScript, the code above may confuse you a bit. The idea here is that calling createBoundedWrapper with a given object and method (which, presumably, belongs to said object) will produce a brand new function (the anonymous one we’re returning).

Should you even bind?

Now that we’ve been through the details of binding, it’s only fair to stress that sometimes, binding is overkill. Specifically, there’s a code pattern in which binding can be replaced, with significant performance profit, by using the lexical closure. (If you’re not clear on a what a closure is, don’t panic.)

Here’s the pattern: some code within a method relies on an anonymous function passed by reference to work. That anonymous function needs to access the surrounding method’s this keyword. For instance, assuming for a minute we have the each iterator within arrays, consider the following code again:

// ...
  processItems: function() {
    this.items.each(function(item) {
      // Process item…
      this.markItemAsProcessed(item);
    });
  },
// ...

The anonymous method can be wrapped around createBoundedWrapper and the inner this would then point to the outer scope's this.

However, such code is not as good an idea as it may seem. We saw that achieving such a “bound reference” requires us to wrap the original method within an anonymous function, which means calling the bound method reference results in two method calls: our anonymous wrapper, and the original method. And if there’s one thing true of just about any language, it’s that method calls are costly.

In this situation, we have access to the original, desired this keyword in the same code location where we define and call the faulty function (the anonymous method we’re passing as an argument to each). We can simply save the proper this reference in a local variable, and use that inside our iteration function:

// ...
  processItems: function() {
    var that = this;
    this.items.each(function(item) {
      // Process item
      that.markItemAsProcessed(item);
    });
  },
// ...

Takeaway points

To recap:

Any member access must be qualified with the object it pertains to, even when it is this.
Any sort of function reference (assigning as a value, passing as an argument) loses the function’s original binding.
JavaScript provides two equivalent ways of explicitly specifying a function’s binding when calling it: apply and call.
Creating a “bound method reference” requires an anonymous wrapper function, and a calling cost. In specific situations, leveraging closures may be a better alternative.

hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

The simple answer is that it doesn't change the context. Or rather, it is consistent with how it changes its context. When you are within the done method, that method is specific for the ajax call you're making. So the this in that case most definitely means something different than this just inside the submit handler.

If you made that ajax call outside of the submit handler, what would you expect this to be?

To sum up: this by definition is contextual. As you change contexts (such is the case of making an ajax call and inside methods/callbacks of that object) the meaning of this will definitely change. If you need previous this context values, you need to keep track of previous this values from higher-up closures, which is exactly what you're doing when setting $this.

share|improve this answer

The context(this) will change depending on how the function is defined and/or executed.

A better way to write it would be:

$.fn.specialbutton = function(callback) {
    this.bind('submit', function() { // $(this) is the a.button, as expected
        $.ajax({
            url: 'ajax.php',
            data: callback.call(this), // explicitly specify context
            context: this, // explicitly specify context
        }).done(function(response) {
            this.html(response); // the context is now correct
        })
    });
}

$('a.button').specialbutton(function() {
    // context pitfall 
    return {
        id: this.data('id'); // this is the element that was submitted
    };
});

Note, anchor tags don't have a submit event, so your code doesn't make much sense...

share|improve this answer

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