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DateTime newDate = new DateTime(2013, 1, 1);

void AddTime()
{

   timer1.Interval = 600000;  
   timer1.Enabled = true;
   timer1.Tick += new EventHandler(timer1_Tick);
   timer1.Start();
}
void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    newDate = newDate.AddMonths(+3);
    lblDate.Text = newDate.ToString();

}

For some reason changing the timer1.Interval does not change the speed of 3 months being added to the newDate, it is always constant. I am trying to have 1 minute real life time equal 3 months in the game. I am using C#.

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3  
For 1 Minute of real time equal three months of game time, you should set the Interval to 1000 * 60. –  nvoigt May 14 '13 at 17:17
3  
Have you called AddTime() anywhere in your code? –  Renan May 14 '13 at 17:18
    
okay I will change interval. @Renan no I haven't and I don't know how, that is all the code I have related to the timer. Any suggestions? –  Nikita Gusev May 14 '13 at 17:22
    
@nvoigt has the time right, is it possible that since your interval set to 10 minutes that you just weren't waiting long enough for the Tick event to fire? –  Chris Searles May 14 '13 at 17:28
1  
You need to post more of your code. You're not calling the method that sets the interval and subscribes to the event? The default interval on a C# Timer is 100 ms, is that how often it fires? –  Chris Searles May 14 '13 at 17:44

4 Answers 4

Your initial timer interval is bit larger. Below is sample complete application. working as expected

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        DateTime newDate = new DateTime(2013, 1, 1);
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            AddTime(); // call the method, otherwise timer will not start 
        }
        void AddTime()
        {
            timer1.Interval = 60000; // every minute (1 minute = 60000 milliseconds)
            timer1.Enabled = true;
            timer1.Tick += new EventHandler(timer1_Tick);
            timer1.Start();
        }
        void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            newDate = newDate.AddMonths(3); 
            label1.Text = newDate.ToString();
        }
        // if you need to set timet interval after timer start, do as below 
        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            timer1.Stop();
            timer1.Interval = 30000; // set interval 30 seconds 
            timer1.Start();
        }
    }
}
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Make sure the value .Interval is the one you want. You have 600 000 that is 600 seconds or 10 min. Did you give enough time to run the event? Debug it and put a breakpoing.

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Your interval is way too high currently, it's 600 seconds instead of 60:

DateTime newDate = new DateTime(2013, 1, 1);
void AddTime()
{

   timer1.Interval = 60000;  // was 600 seconds, now 60
   timer1.Enabled = true;
   timer1.Tick += new EventHandler(timer1_Tick);
   timer1.Start();
}

void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    newDate = newDate.AddMonths(3); // + sign shouldn't be here
    lblDate.Text = newDate.ToString();
}

Edit: Now I see that you aren't calling AddTime() at the moment, and are unclear of where to do it. It is hard to say without more information, but if you are using Winforms you could use the form's load event. Or if it's a class you could use the constructor to call it.

Basically the method that initialises the object that you are working with.

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when I run this code it still adds 3 months every second(not sure of exact time) but its very short and consistent –  Nikita Gusev May 14 '13 at 17:28
    
@NikitaGusev we need to see more of your code to help you with that. –  sharpcloud May 14 '13 at 17:49

You're going about it the wrong way. First compute the RATIO of "game time" to "normal time". Months, however, are problematic since the number of days in a month is variable. Instead, we can use a quarter (365 / 4) and work from there. Use a Stopwatch to track how much time has elapsed, and add that to the reference date to get "real time". "Game time", then, is simply the elapsed time multiplied by the ratio, and then added to the reference time. Using this model, the Timer Interval() is IRREVELANT; we could update once a minute, once a second, or four times a second, and the code for determining real/game time is completely the same...and all times remain accurate when we update the display:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        // update once per second, but the rate here is IRREVELANT...
        // ...and can be changed without affecting the real/game timing
        timer1.Interval = 1000; 
        timer1.Tick += new EventHandler(timer1_Tick);
    }

    private DateTime dtReal;
    private DateTime dtGame;
    private DateTime dtReference;
    private System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch SW = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
    private double TimeRatio = (TimeSpan.FromDays(365).TotalMilliseconds / 4.0) / TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1).TotalMilliseconds;

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        StartTime();
    }        

    private void StartTime()
    {
        dtReference = new DateTime(2013, 1, 1);
        SW.Restart();
        timer1.Start();
    }

    void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        UpdateTimes();
        DisplayTimes();
    }

    private void UpdateTimes()
    {
        double elapsed = (double)SW.ElapsedMilliseconds;
        dtReal = dtReference.AddMilliseconds(elapsed);
        dtGame = dtReference.AddMilliseconds(elapsed * TimeRatio);
    }

    private void DisplayTimes()
    {
        lblReference.Text = dtReference.ToString();
        lblReal.Text = dtReal.ToString();
        lblGame.Text = dtGame.ToString();
    }

}

Edit: Added screenshots...

Just after ONE minute = approx 3 months Just after ONE minute = approx 3 months

Just after FOUR minutes = approx 1 year Just after FOUR minutes = approx 1 year

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your comment, I have not been able to make it work yet but I will try again; any chance that I can see what your form looks like and what you are "using" –  Nikita Gusev May 14 '13 at 21:44
    
It's simply a standard form with a Timer (timer1), a button (button1), and three Labels (lblReference, lblReal, lblGame). Wire up the button Click() event thru the IDE, run it, and click the button. You should see the time changing in the labels...nothing fancy here. –  Idle_Mind May 14 '13 at 22:12
    
Added two screenshots. The first is just after one minute passed, and the seconds is just after four minutes passed. –  Idle_Mind May 14 '13 at 22:24
    
Did you figure out a working solution from any of the answers here? –  Idle_Mind May 16 '13 at 4:46
    
yes I did thank you, I was much easier than I thought and I we over complicated things –  Nikita Gusev May 16 '13 at 7:40

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