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I am using a DataGridView to keep track of a List<myObject>. To populate it, I use this foreach loop:

        foreach (myObject object in myList)
        {
            if (object.Status == Status.Available)
            {
                myDataGridView.Rows.Add(object.Name, object.Status.ToString());

            }
        }

I then use an event to create a new form for the object in the selected row:

    void myDataGridView_CellDoubleClick(object sender, DataGridViewCellEventArgs e)
    {
        var index = myList[myDataGridView.CurrentRow.Index];

        myForm form = new myForm(index);
    }

So this works just fine until the status of an item in the list changes:

        myList[10].Status = Status.Unavailable;

Now when myDataGridView is updated, I can no longer use the row index to open the correct form for any row past 10. I'm at a loss as to what to do.

Can anybody tell me how to open the correct form even though the indices don't match up anymore?

EDIT: myList holds characters in a game, some who are available for hire and some who aren't. I need myDataGridView to only be populated with those whose status is Available.

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Are you storing the list of forms somewhere? or you want to create a new instance of form everytime you double click a row based upon the index value? Can you show what have you got in the constructor of the form and what are you doing with the index that is passed into it? –  Azhar Khorasany May 14 '13 at 17:35
    
The forms are meant to be created and disposed of. To put things into context, myObject is a character in the game, new instances of which will be created often and with random attributes. This DataGridView is supposed to represent characters available for hire. The form shows the character's info. I tried using dataSource, but each object will have many attributes, only a few of which I want displayed. –  Jason D May 14 '13 at 17:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Somehow you have to associate the index in your list with the row. One way you could do this is to have a hidden column in your grid that maintains the mapping between a row and the correct list index. To add a hidden column, modify your insert code as follows:

int i = 0;
foreach (myObject object in myList)
{
     if (object.Status == Status.Available)
     {
         myDataGridView.Rows.Add(object.Name, object.Status.ToString(), i);
     }

     i++;
}

//Hide the third column
myDataGridView.Columns[2].Visible = false;

Then during the CellDoubleClick event you can reference this hidden column to get the true index of the item in this row.

void myDataGridView_CellDoubleClick(object sender, DataGridViewCellEventArgs e)
{
    int listIndex = (int)myDataGridView.CurrentRow.Cells[2].Value;

    var index = myList[listIndex];

    myForm form = new myForm(index);
}
share|improve this answer
    
On the line declaring listIndex, I'm getting an error saying "Cannot convert type 'System.Windows.Forms.DataGridViewCell' to 'int'". –  Jason D May 14 '13 at 18:19
    
Doh, you're right. I left off the ".Value" property. I've modified the line in my example above –  Eric W May 23 '13 at 19:21

By modifying alabamasux' answer, I managed to get it working.

var index = myList[(int)myDataGridView.CurrentRow.Cells[2].Value];
myForm form = new myForm(index);
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I dont really see why doing it this way, when you can populate the gridview directly with the list you want with:

class TestObject { public string Code { get; set; } public string Text { get; set; } }

void PopulateGrid()
{
    TestObject test1 = new TestObject()
    {
    Code = "code 1",
    Text = "text 1"
    };
    TestObject test2 = new TestObject()
   {
    Code = "code 2",
    Text = "text 2"
    };
    List<TestObject> list = new List<TestObject>();
    list.Add(test1);
    list.Add(test2);

    dataGridView1.DataSource = list; //THIS IS WHAT SHOULD DO IT
}
share|improve this answer
    
See my comment above. –  Jason D May 14 '13 at 17:42

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