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I have a class A and a < comparator. How can I use them to sort an array of A in descending order?

class A {
...
};

class LessA {
   bool operator()(const A& a1, const A& a2) const {
   ...
   }
}

vector<A> v;
sort(v.begin(), v.end(), ???);

I suppose I should replace the ??? with something based on LessA, but I can't figure out what should go in there. I thought of using a lambda function, but I was looking for something shorter.

share|improve this question
    
    
A lambda is probably your best bet here. –  Joel May 14 '13 at 18:36

5 Answers 5

If you want to sort according to the relation defined by your LessA comparator, just pass an instance of LessA as the third argument (and, since you are using C++11, prefer the global std::begin() and std::end() functions):

std::sort(std::begin(a), std::end(a), LessA());
//                                    ^^^^^^^

Now if your LessA() expresses the < relation and you want to sort according to the opposite criterion, you could do:

std::sort(std::begin(a), std::end(a), 
    [] (A const& a1, A const& a2))
{
    return LessA()(a2, a1);
}

Another thing you could do is to let your custom comparator accept an argument that determines how it should perform the comparison:

class CompA {
    bool lessThan;
public:
    CompA(bool lessThan) : _lessThan(lessThan) { }
    bool operator()(const A& a1, const A& a2) const {
        if (_lessThan)
        {
            // return true iff a1 < a2;
        }
        else
        {
            // return true iff a1 > a2;
        }
    }
};

You could then use it this way to sort in ascending order:

std::sort(std::begin(a), std::end(a), CompA(true));

And this way to sort in descending order:

std::sort(std::begin(a), std::end(a), CompA(false));

Another possibility, given your original LessA comparator, is to use std::bind to swap the order of the arguments to your custom comparator:

LessA comp;
using namespace std::placeholders;
std::sort(std::begin(v), std::end(v), 
    std::bind(&LessA::operator(), comp, _2, _1));
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but that would sort v in ascending order. I want it in descending order. –  Paul Baltescu May 14 '13 at 18:28
1  
@PaulBaltescu Just flip what your comparison does then. –  RandyGaul May 14 '13 at 18:32
1  
@Magtheridon96: None, but std::begin() is more general (it works with C arrays as well) –  Andy Prowl May 14 '13 at 18:34
1  
@AndyProwl: Why use !=, when a > b is quivalent to b < a? –  Grizzly May 14 '13 at 18:42
1  
I would think e.g. std::bind(LessA(), _2, _1) is a more natural bind expression. –  Luc Danton May 15 '13 at 3:26

Sort the range backwards:

vector<A> v;
sort(v.rbegin(), v.rend(), LessA());

rbegin, and rend give you reverse iterators.

Encapsulate if it's too confusing:

void reverse_sort(vector<A>& v) {
    sort(v.rbegin(), v.rend(), LessA());    
}

Usage:

vector<A> v;
reverse_sort(v);
share|improve this answer
    
I really don't like this version. –  Xeo May 14 '13 at 19:23
    
@Xeo What can I say, you have 30 upvotes for saying the opposite of me. 30 upvoters can't be wrong (c: –  Peter Wood May 14 '13 at 19:28
1  
I didn't mean to use the upvotes as an argument, I just meant my answer as an extended explanation on why I don't like this version. Sorry if it seemed like the former. –  Xeo May 14 '13 at 19:41
    
@Xeo I appreciate that (c: I've encapsulated the function call, if that sweetens it at all. –  Peter Wood May 14 '13 at 20:00
1  
I like this one. It's not more complex than special reverse comparison type, lambda or bind. Was it possible to use std::greater it would be better, but IMO here it is justified to use reverse range. –  zch May 14 '13 at 23:54

Use std::greater for the comparison functor. The default (std::less) will give you an ascending order; this will give you a descending order. (You'll need to add a using namespace std::rel_ops; (link) statement or explicitly define operator> as well.)

Example

Taken from cppreference.com

#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <array>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::array<int, 10> s = {5, 7, 4, 2, 8, 6, 1, 9, 0, 3}; 

    // sort using the default operator<
    std::sort(s.begin(), s.end());
    for (int a : s) {
        std::cout << a << " ";
    }   
    std::cout << '\n';

    // sort using a standard library compare function
    std::sort(s.begin(), s.end(), std::greater<int>());
    for (int a : s) {
        std::cout << a << " ";
    }   
    std::cout << '\n';

    // sort using a custom functor
    struct {
        bool operator()(int a, int b)
        {   
            return a < b;
        }   
    } customLess;
    std::sort(s.begin(), s.end(), customLess);
    for (int a : s) {
        std::cout << a << " ";
    }   
    std::cout << '\n';

    // sort using a lambda
    std::sort(s.begin(), s.end(), [](int a, int b) {
        return b < a;   
    });
    for (int a : s) {
        std::cout << a << " ";
    } 
    std::cout << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
    
How can I use greater in conjunction with objects of type A? –  Paul Baltescu May 14 '13 at 19:11
    
@PaulBaltescu You should overload the operator< for your class A and then everything will work automatically if you use std::greater<A>. –  Timothy Shields May 14 '13 at 19:12
    
@PaulBaltescu I just made an edit. See the second paragraph in my answer for an alternative you could use. –  Timothy Shields May 14 '13 at 19:17
    
@TimothyShields, std::greater uses operator>, it won't work with a class that only defines operator<, and the negation of less greater-or-equal, so is not a StrictWeakOrdering. –  Jonathan Wakely May 14 '13 at 23:14
    
@JonathanWakely I assume this ( using rel_ops link) is standard? If not then yeah you have to explicitly define the operator> as well. –  Timothy Shields May 14 '13 at 23:24

Given a function lt(a, b) that implements a<b, you can create a function that implements a>=b by returning !lt(a, b). To implement >, you need to return !lt(b, a) && !(lt(a,b) || lt(b,a)).

lt(a, b) || lt(b, a) is equivalent to a!=b, so the above is equivalent to a>=b && a!=b which reduces to a>b.

However, you can probably get away with just std::not2(LessA()). That will sort with >= which will sort in descending order.

share|improve this answer

Make the () operator of the LessA class return !(a1 < a2) and pass it in like this:

std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), LessA());
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but that would sort v in ascending order. I want it in descending order. –  Paul Baltescu May 14 '13 at 18:28
    
Edited the answer. –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun May 14 '13 at 18:32
2  
!(a1 < a2) will get you greater than, I think you want (a2 < a1) instead –  K-ballo May 14 '13 at 18:40
    
I just negated the condition he told me is giving him backwards results and achieved that. Frankly, I can't tell which will yield correct results :p –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun May 14 '13 at 18:41
    
@Magtheridon96 Generally speaking (there are exceptions), !(a < b) is equivalent to a >= b. You should negate the result of the hypothetical a <=> b operation: two items that previously compared as equal should continue to compare as equal (neither compares as less than the other). –  hvd May 14 '13 at 18:46

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