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I have an HTML structure like:

<div class='content'>
 <h2>Title</h2>
 <p>Some content for Title</p>
 <h2>Another Title</h2> 
 <p>Content for Another Title</p>
 <p>Some more content for Another title</p>
 <h2>Third</h2>
 <p>Third Content</p>
</div>

I am trying to write code to output:

Title
 - Some content for Title
Another Title
 - Content for Another Title
 - Some more content for Another title
Third
 - Third Content

I've never used Nokogiri until five minutes ago, all I can come up with so far is:

content = doc.at_css('.content')
content.css('h2').each do |node|
  puts node.text
end
content.css('p').each do |node|
  puts " - "
  puts node.text
end

This obviously doesn't group the pieces together. How can I achieve my required grouping with Nokogiri?

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1  
You've used it for less than 10 minutes at this point, and you're already asking for help? Have you read the tutorials and looked through the many questions and answers here on Stack Overflow in the remaining five minutes? –  the Tin Man May 14 '13 at 18:57
    
I usually agree with this sentiment but grouping sibling elements like that is tricky. And he did show code. –  pguardiario May 15 '13 at 8:06
    
@theTinMan no. Instead I spent my time working on things where I could be productive, and eventually my question was answered. Instead of spending minutes, maybe hours reading tutorials, I invested a few seconds to ask my question, and got my answer. –  parker.sikand May 15 '13 at 20:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There are many ways to do it, here's one:

doc.at_css('.content').element_children.each do |node|
  puts(node.name == "h2" ? node.text : " - #{node.text}")  
end
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You almost had it. Here's how I would fix it.

content.css('h2').each do |node|
  puts node.text
  while node = node.at('+ p')
    puts " - #{node.text}"
  end
end

+ p means the next (adjacent) p

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