Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the iPhone music app, selecting Artist, Songs, or Albums presents a tableView with a verticl list of single letters at the righthand side of the UI that enables rapid scrolling. How do I enable this functionality in my app?

Cheers, Doug

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 102 down vote accepted

Supply your own index characters:

- (NSArray *)sectionIndexTitlesForTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
    return[NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"a", @"e", @"i", @"m", @"p", nil];
}

and then:

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView sectionForSectionIndexTitle:(NSString
    *)title atIndex:(NSInteger)index {
        return <yourSectionIndexForTheSectionForSectionIndexTitle >;
}

You will need sections.

share|improve this answer
14  
Is there a way to have indexes without having sections (for a flat list)? –  ThE uSeFuL Sep 9 '11 at 5:26
5  
@ThEuSeFuL You can have sections without showing section headers. This would look like a flat list to the end user. –  Jon Hull Nov 10 '12 at 6:14
5  
what is"yourSectionIndexForTheSectionForSectionIndexTitle" meant by? –  ravoorinandan Oct 3 '13 at 8:27

Something else you have to consider is localizing the sections for each language. After digging around a bit, I found UILocalizedIndexedCollation to be quite useful:

- (NSString *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView titleForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section {
    return [[[UILocalizedIndexedCollation currentCollation] sectionTitles] objectAtIndex:section];
}

- (NSArray *)sectionIndexTitlesForTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
    return [[UILocalizedIndexedCollation currentCollation] sectionIndexTitles];
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView sectionForSectionIndexTitle:(NSString *)title atIndex:(NSInteger)index {
    return [[UILocalizedIndexedCollation currentCollation] sectionForSectionIndexTitleAtIndex:index];
}

http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/iPhone/Reference/UILocalizedIndexedCollation_Class/UILocalizedIndexedCollation.html

share|improve this answer
    
+1 easy and nice way for IndexSction –  iMeMyself Jul 17 '13 at 4:50

A bunch of people asked if it was possible to do this without sections. I wanted the same thing and I found a solution which might be a little shady and doesn't return a value to sectionForSectionIndexTitle but if you are in a corner and don't want to have to make a section for every letter of the alphabet this is a sure fix. Sorry to any code Nazis in advance. :P

- (NSArray *)sectionIndexTitlesForTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
    if (thisTableDataIsShowing)
    {
        NSMutableArray *charactersForSort = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
        for (NSDictionary *item in d_itemsInTable)
        {
            if (![charactersForSort containsObject:[[item valueForKey:@"character_field_to_sort_by"] substringToIndex:1]])
            {
                [charactersForSort addObject:[[item valueForKey:@"character_field_to_sort_by"] substringToIndex:1]];
            }
        }
        return charactersForSort;
    }
    return nil;
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView sectionForSectionIndexTitle:(NSString *)title atIndex:(NSInteger)index {
    BOOL found = NO;
    NSInteger b = 0;
    for (NSDictionary *item in d_itemsInTable)
    {
        if ([[[item valueForKey:@"character_field_to_sort_by"] substringToIndex:1] isEqualToString:title])
            if (!found)
            {
                [d_yourTableView scrollToRowAtIndexPath:[NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:b inSection:0] atScrollPosition:UITableViewScrollPositionTop animated:NO];
                found = YES;
            }
        b++;
    }
}

It works great if you are getting a large amount of data and sectioning it would take a bunch of work. :) Tried to use generic variables so you knew what I was doing. d_itemsInTable is an NSArray of NSDictionaries that I'm listing out to the UITableView.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can just return b. –  AMayes Jan 10 '13 at 20:11
    
Fun fax: If you return -1, it will ignore compiler warnings, and not try to scroll to that section from the sectionForSectionIndexTitle method –  elimirks Jul 8 '13 at 15:29
    
Really awesome sample thanks allot maybe adding a brake after fund= YES; would also not be that bad ^^ –  Mingebag Jul 18 '13 at 6:14

I came up with an alternative approach to handling a single letter alphabet list without using sections. It's similar to Zaph's answer but instead of getting any value from returning a new index (since we'll always have 1 section), we calculate the index for the location of the first item in the array that begins with a certain character, then scroll to it.

The downside is this requires searching the array every time (is this absolutely terrible?), however I didn't notice any lag or slow behavior in the iOS simulator or on my iPhone 4S.

- (NSArray *)sectionIndexTitlesForTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
  return[NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"A", @"B", @"C", @"D", @"E", @"F", @"G", @"H", @"I", @"J", @"K", @"L", @"M", @"N", @"O", @"P", @"Q", @"R", @"S", @"T", @"U", @"V", @"W", @"X", @"Y", @"Z", nil];
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView sectionForSectionIndexTitle:(NSString *)title atIndex:(NSInteger)index {

  NSInteger newRow = [self indexForFirstChar:title inArray:self.yourStringArray];
  NSIndexPath *newIndexPath = [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:newRow inSection:0];
  [tableView scrollToRowAtIndexPath:newIndexPath atScrollPosition:UITableViewScrollPositionTop animated:NO];

  return index;
}

// Return the index for the location of the first item in an array that begins with a certain character
- (NSInteger)indexForFirstChar:(NSString *)character inArray:(NSArray *)array
{
  NSUInteger count = 0;
  for (NSString *str in array) {
    if ([str hasPrefix:character]) {
      return count;
    }
    count++;
  }
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
6  
upvoted just since it means I didn't have to type in the alphabet array! –  Paul Cezanne May 21 '13 at 18:12
1  
heh. it's also not a bad solution either ...apple accepted me for cocoa camp using this in my code sample. whether that means they officially endorse it or not... I do not know ;). –  Kyle Clegg May 22 '13 at 4:33
    
@PaulCezanne Actually, to make it cleaner I suggest you loop through your array of strings and grab the upperCase first letters of all strings so that your list is dynamic in that you won't have any Q's if you don't have any items that begin with the letter Q. Let me know if you'd like me to update my code to show this. –  Kyle Clegg Jun 6 '13 at 16:31
    
Thanks. I actually did that in another app I was working on. It looked pretty weird in practice. The A-Z array on the side is pretty explanatory. When you have only a few letter, which you will have if you only have a small number of songs or if you've filtered a lot, the purpose of the letters along the side looks odd. –  Paul Cezanne Jun 6 '13 at 17:25
1  
@Mingebag Try debugging it by checking what indexForFirstChar's return value is each time it's called. It should be between 0 and 25 each time. If it's > 25 then perhaps you have non-alphabetical characters or something else causing it to return too high a value. –  Kyle Clegg Jul 17 '13 at 15:20

Implement the delegate methods -sectionIndexTitlesForTableView: and -tableView:sectionForSectionIndexTitle:atIndex:

See the UITableViewDataSource documentation for more info.

share|improve this answer

Here is a modified version of Kyle's function that handles the case of clicking an index for which you do not have a string:

- (NSInteger)indexForFirstChar:(NSString *)character inArray:(NSArray *)array
{
    char testChar = [character characterAtIndex:0];
    __block int retIdx = 0;
    __block int lastIdx = 0;

    [array enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        char firstChar = [obj characterAtIndex:0];

        if (testChar == firstChar) {
            retIdx = idx;
            *stop = YES;
        }

        //if we overshot the target, just use whatever previous one was
        if (testChar < firstChar) {
            retIdx = lastIdx;
            *stop = YES;
        }

        lastIdx = idx;
    }];
    return retIdx;
}
share|improve this answer

If you're using a NSFetchedResultsController, you can just do:

- (NSArray *)sectionIndexTitlesForTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
    return [frc sectionIndexTitles];
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView sectionForSectionIndexTitle:(NSString *)title atIndex:(NSInteger)index {
    return [frc sectionForSectionIndexTitle:title atIndex:index];
}
share|improve this answer

If you're using MonoTouch, override the SectionIndexTitles(UITableView) method in the UITableViewDataSource class. Just return an array of strings and the subclass takes care of the rest.

class TableViewDataSource : UITableViewDataSource
{
  public override string[] SectionIndexTitles(UITableView tableView) 
  { 
    return new string[] { /*your string values */};
  }
}

*just a hint for those of us using C# and Mono (.NET) to write iPhone apps. :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.