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I can't seem to figure out why this code,

class test{
    public:
    int number;
    test(int pass){
      number = pass;
    }
};

int main(){
   test x(3);
   test y(2);
   test z[2]={x,y};
   y.number = 1;
   cout << "z[0].number: " << z[0].number << endl;
   cout << "z[1].number: " << z[1].number << endl;
   cout << "x.number: " << x.number << endl;
   cout << "y.number: " << y.number << endl;
   return 0;
}

Comes up with this output,

z[0].number: 3
z[1].number: 2
x.number: 3
y.number: 1

Instead of this one,

z[0].number: 3
z[1].number: 1
x.number: 3
y.number: 1

How can I make the second output possible? I've searched for this for three days, and still no luck :(

share|improve this question
1  
x = 2; y = x; x= 3;. Now y is still 2. Same thing. – stardust May 14 '13 at 19:58
5  
And I never actually explained my upvote. Since it's valuable to newcomers, you did a lot right in this post. The title is relevant, you showed a short, self-contained, compilable example that reproduces your results, you showed what results you expected, and you showed what results you got. It was very easy to see what you were asking without needing more information. Each of those is better than what I see a lot of every day. – chris May 14 '13 at 20:18
1  
Let me guess, come from a Java or C# background? If so, may want to pick up a book and read a bit. There are near syntactically equivalent constructs across the languages that have entirely different semantics. – Nathan Ernst May 14 '13 at 23:36
    
By the way, if an answer helped you, the norm on SO is to click the checkmark beside it. This brings it to the top of the list so it's easily visible for others who come looking for answers to the same problem, so pick the one you want, keeping that in mind. Checking one shows that the question is actually answered. – chris May 15 '13 at 21:55

When you say:

test z[2] = {x, y};

z holds two copy-constructed instances of test. Since you didn't put in a copy constructor, it uses the default, which copies all data members. Thus, z contains a copy of x and a copy of y. That's why changing y doesn't change what's in z. It's not like Java where everything is a reference.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the last sentence – Andy Prowl May 14 '13 at 19:59
2  
@AndyProwl, I'm finding it scary how I'm relating to Java a lot more now that my one course in it is almost done. I've confirmed what I already knew about how much I like using Java. – chris May 14 '13 at 20:03
    
Thank you Chris – WebGL3D May 14 '13 at 20:04
    
So wait, how can I make z[0] and z[1] a reference of x, and y? – WebGL3D May 14 '13 at 20:08
    
@1Topcop, Roddy got close the first time. You can use an array of std::reference_wrapper, which acts like a reassignable reference (noted by a & in a declaration in C++). For example, coliru.stacked-crooked.com/…. Note that this has alias semantics, not Java-like semantics (e.g. using assignment on the thing being referred to will change the reference). Java-like semantics are more like an array of pointers, but pointers have worse syntax. – chris May 14 '13 at 20:11

I initially wrote "You can make z be an array of references to test objects."

test &z[2] = {x,y};  // Wrong, wrong, wrong!

...but as I now realize - it's not as simple as that, as C++ does not allow arrays of references directly.

As @chris comments, in C++11 using std::reference_wrapper gets around this limitation.

std::reference_wrapper<test> z[2] = {x,y};
share|improve this answer
1  
Well, can you? ideone.com/5DDG2G – Lol4t0 May 14 '13 at 20:04
    
Pretty sure arrays of references aren't allowed by the standard. (As far as it's concerned, references are basically aliases...they're not even required to take up any space.) – cHao May 14 '13 at 20:04
1  
I can't get this to compile, and I'm pretty sure arrays of references are not allowed. – Mark B May 14 '13 at 20:04
1  
This is an excellent answer in conjunction with mine. This would give the same semantics as Java has. I think you can still use an array of std::reference_wrapper to get around the restrictions. – chris May 14 '13 at 20:04
    
oops.............. – Roddy May 14 '13 at 20:05

When you create your array z with test z[2]={x,y}; you're actually making a copy of the values of x and y at the time you create the array. They are then two independent sets of values from then on, and even when you modify one, the other is still unchanged.

What you can do is create an array of pointers to the elements (since arrays of references aren't possible):

test* z[2] = {&x,&y};
cout << "z[0]->number: " << z[0]->number << endl;
cout << "z[1]->number: " << z[1]->number << endl;

But are you OK initializing the array and then taking references to it instead?

test z[2]={3, 2};
test& x(test[0]);
test& y(test[1]);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you!!! This worked! :D – WebGL3D May 14 '13 at 20:11
    
I like the backwards thinking here with respect to having the individual variables refer to the array elements. Of course the pointers are probably closest to the expected semantics as well. – chris May 14 '13 at 20:20

z[1] and y are not the same objects. What you've done is copy-initialized z[1] from the current value of y.

If you want the behavior, you'll have to do explicitly use pointer types (c++ does not allow arrays of references) like this:

class test{
    public:
    int number;
    test(int pass){
      number = pass;
    }
};

int main(){
   test x(3);
   test y(2);
   test *z[2]={&x,&y};
   y.number = 1;
   cout << "z[0]->number: " << z[0]->number << endl;
   cout << "z[1]->number: " << z[1]->number << endl;
   cout << "x.number: " << x.number << endl;
   cout << "y.number: " << y.number << endl;
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've just tried this, and it's giving me this error: declaration of 'z' as array of references? (Sorry, I'm still learning C++) – WebGL3D May 14 '13 at 20:03
    
1Topcop, see updated answer. C++ does not allow arrays of references – Jeff Paquette May 14 '13 at 20:12

C++ doesn't allow an array of references, but that's where std::reference_wrapper comes in handy:

#include <vector>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    test x(1), y(2);

    std::vector<std::reference_wrapper<test>> z{ std::ref(x), std::ref(y) };

    x.number = 5;
    y.number = 3;

    std::cout << z[0].get().number << std::endl; // 5
    std::cout << z[1].get().number << std::endl; // 3
}

Live Demo

This example also uses std::vector, which is recommended in place of your C-style arrays.

share|improve this answer

Variable z[1] is a copy of y, not a reference to y. So after initializing array z any modification on x or y does not affects the value of z[0] or z[1].

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