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This is a problem of cleanliness.

I'm using prototypes to implement basic inheritance to keep my code DRY, I have a few prototypes which are for all intents and purposes abstract (it is not expected that they will ever be instantiated outside of being set as prototypes for other objects) and they contain some code that the "child" objects will call. The problem is that the functions in the prototype rely on some of the prototype's fields. Updating the field on the child object obviously does not modify the prototype's field. I want to avoid calling

childObject.prototype.field = foo;

as that gets messy the deeper the inheritance goes.

Below I've pasted an example which explains what I'm trying to do. You can see it running on jsfiddle here.

//Prints something once.
function Printer(text) {
    this.text = text || "";
    this.print = function () {
        alert(text);
    };
}

//Prints everything a set number of times
function AnnoyingPrinter(text, count) {
    this.prototype = new Printer(text);
    this.count = count || 1;

    this.print = function () {
        for (var i = 0; i < this.count; i++) {
            this.prototype.print();
        }
    };
}

function doStuff() {
    var annoyer = new AnnoyingPrinter("Hello world!", 2);
    annoyer.print();
    //Now I want to change the text without having to dig down into the prototype     (particularly if I ever want to extend AnnoyingPrinter too)
    annoyer.text = "Goodbye world!";
    annoyer.print();
}

//Expected outcome:
//Hello world!
//Hello world!
//Goodbye world!
//Goodbye world!


//Actual outcome:
//Hello world!
//Hello world!
//Hello world!
//Hello world!
doStuff();
share|improve this question
    
Why are you assigning to a property named .prototype in the constructor in the first place? That's now how prototypal inheritance works. –  squint May 14 '13 at 20:44
    
I think I must have picked up some bad habits while learning JS, what's the correct way to do it? –  Nick Udell May 14 '13 at 20:47
    
Are you wanting AnnoyingPrinter to inherit from Printer? If so, I'll put together an answer that shows a good pattern. –  squint May 14 '13 at 20:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a typical pattern for prototypal inheritance.

function Printer(text) {
    this.text = text || "";
}
Printer.prototype.print = function() {
    alert(this.text);
}

function AnnoyingPrinter(text, count) {
    Printer.call(this, text);
    this.count = count || 1;
}
AnnoyingPrinter.prototype = Object.create(Printer.prototype);

AnnoyingPrinter.prototype.printAll = function() {
    for (var i = 0; i < this.count; i++) {
        this.print();
    }
}

So then your doStuff() can go ahead and create a new AnnoyingPrinter, and call print().

function doStuff() {
    var annoyer = new AnnoyingPrinter("Hello world!", 2);
    annoyer.printAll();   // "Hello world!" "Hello world!"
    annoyer.text = "Goodbye world!";
    annoyer.printAll();   // "Goodbye world!" "Goodbye world!"
}

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/DhbgE/

I just had to change it so that the two constructors had different method names. If we gave AnnoyingPrinter a .print() method, it would shadow the one from the Printer.

share|improve this answer
    
As an aside, I find it interesting that MDN doesn't use this pattern: developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/JavaScript/Reference/…. Do you have a link to the advantages/disadvantages to your answer versus Ben336's? (Edited because I forgot you can't hit enter on comments) –  Nick Udell May 14 '13 at 21:11
    
My mistake, it appears they do. –  Nick Udell May 14 '13 at 21:17
1  
@NickUdell: Well, doing it that way, you're not really benefiting from inheritance. Every object is getting its own functions instead of inheriting them from a shared prototype object. There are times when it makes sense to do that, but usually it'll be when you're establishing a "has a..." relationship instead of an "is a..." relationship. –  squint May 14 '13 at 21:18
    
Oh! I see now, thanks for the clarification! –  Nick Udell May 14 '13 at 21:18
1  
@NickUdell: Yep, that'll work. Another way would be to just have the .print() method on Printer.prototype, have it look for a valid .count, and if there isn't one, default to 1. –  squint May 14 '13 at 23:28

Store the properties on the local object instead and reference them in the prototype function. You don't want to keep state in a prototype object, that should really just be for functions (or if necessary "static" fields).

http://jsfiddle.net/C7aPQ/2/

//Prints something once.
function Printer(text)
{
    this.text = text || "";
    this.print = function()
    {
        alert(this.text);
    };
}

//Prints everything a set number of times
function AnnoyingPrinter(text,count)
{
    this.prototype = new Printer(text);
    this.text = text;
    this.count = count || 1;

    this.print = function()
    {
        for(var i =0;i<this.count;i++)
        {
            this.prototype.print.call(this);
        }
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why are you duplicating the text property? –  Ian May 14 '13 at 20:43
    
Ah, I don't think I've come across the .call method before. This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  Nick Udell May 14 '13 at 20:45
    
@Ian Because he may still want to create a printer. Its not an idea design obviously. If I were doing it I wouldn't bother with calling the inherited method at all, or would rename it. But this was the minimal way to make his design work. –  Ben McCormick May 14 '13 at 20:46
    
I should add that this is a greatly simplified version of the current design. The code in my equivalent of print is 100 lines long, and for maintainability alone I'd like to keep it in one place where possible. Similarly there is more than one object with Printer as its prototype. –  Nick Udell May 14 '13 at 20:49

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