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Using Delphi 2010

Hi, I am looking for a way to break out of a loop using a key press (example 'x')

procedure TfrmMain.btnSpinClick(Sender: TObject);

function IsControlKeyPressed: Boolean;
begin
  Result := GetKeyState(Ord('x')) < 0;
end;

var
 ProductList: TStringList;
 I, Integer;
begin
  Screen.Cursor:= crHourGlass;
  Spinning:= True;
  UpdateAll;
  Application.ProcessMessages;
  //create a product list
  ProductList:= TStringList.Create;
  ProductList.LoadFromFile(edtProductsFile.Text);
  Progressbar1.Min:= 1;
  Progressbar1.Max:= ProductList.Count - 1;
  //interate through the product list
  //skip first line (its the field names) and start at the second line
  for I:=  1 to ProductList.Count - 1 do
  begin
    //***************
   //other code here
   //***************
   Progressbar1.Position:= Progressbar1.Position + 1;
   ***if IsControlKeyPressed then Break;
   Application.ProcessMessages;***
  end; //for I:=  1 to ProductList.Count - 1 do
  ProductList.Clear;
  ProductList.Free;
  Thesaurus.Clear;
  Thesaurus.Free;
  Screen.Cursor:= crDefault;
  Spinning:= False;
  UpdateAll;
  Application.ProcessMessages;
end;
share|improve this question
    
Jake, please do not take offense to this, but please take a look at the following article to understand why ProcessMessages is not a good solution: delphi.about.com/b/2011/07/29/… – Jerry Dodge May 15 '13 at 14:17

Move your long-running code into a separate thread. In it, occasionally check whether a certain flag is set. When it's set, stop.

Then, write an OnKeyPress event handler for your form. When that event handler detects that the magic key combination has been pressed, set the flag. That will cause the thread to stop doing its work.

It could work something like this:

type
  TProcessProductListThread = class(TThread)
  private
    FFileName: string;
    FProgressBar: TProgressBar;
    FMax: Integer;
    procedure SetProgressBarRange;
    procedure IncrementProgressBar;
    procedure ProcessProduct(const AProduct: string);
  protected
    procedure Execute; override;
  public
    constructor Create(const AFileName: string; AProgressBar: TProgressBar;
      OnThreadTerminate: TNotifyEvent);
  end;

The constructor receives all the information it will need to do its work, but doesn't actually start doing any of it. That's reserved for the Execute method. We set FreeOnTerminate := False because the main thread will need to continue to have access to the thread object after it's begun running.

constructor TProcessProductListThread.Create(const AFileName: string;
  AProgressBar: TProgressBar; OnThreadTerminate: TNotifyEvent);
begin
  inherited Create(False);
  FFileName := AFileName;
  FProgressBar := AProgressBar;
  OnTerminate := OnThreadTerminate;
  FreeOnTerminate := False;
end;

Your code interacts with the GUI in a couple of places. That needs to happen from the GUI thread, so we'll extract that code into separate methods that can be passed to Synchronize:

procedure TProcessProductList.SetProgressBarRange);
begin
  FProgressBar.Min := 1;
  FProgressBar.Position := FProgressBar.Min;
  FProgressBar.Max := FMax;
end;

procedure TProcessProduceList.IncrementProgressBar;
begin
  FProgressBar.Position := FProgressBar.Position + 1;
end;

You'll notice that the Execute method looks similar to your original code. Notice how it uses the values previously saved from the constructor.

procedure TProcessProductList.Execute;
var
  ProductList: TStringList;
  I: Integer;
begin
  ProductList := TStringList.Create;
  try
    ProductList.LoadFromFile(FFileName);
    FMax := ProductList.Count - 1;
    Synchronize(SetProgressBarRange);

    // skip first line (it's the field names) and start at the second line
    for I := 1 to ProductList.Count - 1 do begin
      ProcessProduct(ProductList[I]);

      Synchronize(IncrementProgressBar);
      if Terminated then
        exit;
    end;
  finally
    ProductList.Free;
  end;
end;

To start the thread, create it like this:

ProcessThread := TProcessProductList.Create(edtProductsFile.Text, Progressbar1,
  OnProcessProductListTerminate);

Handle the termination with an event handler like below. It's mostly the stuff from the epilogue of your original code, but it also clears ProcessThread; that way, its value can indicate whether the thread is still running.

procedure TForm1.OnProcessProductListTerminate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Thesaurus.Clear;
  Thesaurus.Free;
  UpdateAll;
  ProcessThread := nil;
end;

Remember that I said you should set a flag when the key is pressed? In the code above, the flag it checks is simply the thread's own Terminated property. To set it, call the thread's Terminate method.

procedure TForm1.FormKeyPress(Sender: TObject; var Key: Char);
begin
  if Char = 'X' then begin
    ProcessThread.Terminate;
    ProcessThread.Free;
    Char := #0;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Why oh why wasn't this the accepted answer? – Jerry Dodge May 15 '13 at 1:03
    
Because multithreading is hard, @Jerry, and nobody accepts a multithreading answer when its competition is a one-liner. – Rob Kennedy May 15 '13 at 1:34
    
+1 Multithreading is hard indeed, once you know the pitfalls, it becomes easy... – whosrdaddy May 15 '13 at 8:32

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