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I've been experimenting with 'dynamically calling functions' using the source code below. After successfully testing this code with testing_function only accepting the first two arguments, I added in a third and decided 'not to supply the argument' when I call the function. I've noticed that when I do this, the value of the third argument is not (necessarily) 0, but a 'random' value that which I do not know the origin of.

Questions follow:

  • Where are these values originating from?
  • Additionaly, how are arguments passed to functions?
  • Is it bad practice to not pass arguments?
  • Can one be prepared for additions to a function's arguments without recompiling code utilizing the function? (example: a dynamically loaded library's function gains an accepted argument but code utilizing the function isn't going to be recompiled).

Foreword to source code follows:

I am running using Linux, compiling/calling a linker with GCC 4.6.3, and receive no compilation/linking warnings/errors when utilizing this code. This code executes 'perfectly'. I call gcc like the following:

gcc -x c -ansi -o (output file) (input file, .c suffix)

Source code follows:

#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/* Function for testing. */
int testing_function(char* something, char* somethingelse, int somethingadditional)
{
    int alt_errno = errno;
    if ((something != NULL)&&(somethingelse != NULL))
    {
        errno = 0;
        if (fprintf(stdout, "testing_function(\"%s\", \"%s\", %d);\n", something, somethingelse, somethingadditional) <= 0)
        {
            if (errno != 0)
            {
                int alt_alt_errno = errno;
                perror("fprintf(stdout, \"testing_function(\\\"%%s\\\", \\\"%%s\\\", %%d);\\n\", something, somethingelse, somethingadditional)");
                errno = alt_errno;
                return alt_alt_errno;
            }
            else
            {
                errno = ENOSYS;
                perror("fprintf(stdout, \"testing_function(\\\"%%s\\\", \\\"%%s\\\", %%d);\\n\", something, somethingelse, somethingadditional)");
                errno = alt_errno;
                return ENOSYS;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            errno = alt_errno;
            return 0;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        errno = ENOSYS;
        perror("testing_function(char* something, char* somethingelse, int somethingadditional)");
        errno = alt_errno;
        return ENOSYS;
    }
}

/* Main function. */
int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int (*function)(char*, char*);
    *(void**) (&function) = testing_function;
    exit(function("Hello", "world!"));
}
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1  
I hope someone decides to tackle this properly because it's a really good question (this is what SO is for!). Unfortunately a good answer will be blog-post-length. Perhaps it would help to limit the scope to the first two points and asking a follow-up question with the last two after you have read the answers. –  Jon May 14 '13 at 21:28
    
Thank you 'Scott Shelby' and 'Dukeling', if thanking others for cleaning up unnecessary stuff is appropriate. :) –  Draeton May 14 '13 at 21:29
8  
It's just undefined behaviour all the way through... –  Kerrek SB May 14 '13 at 21:29
1  
@Jon I sort of feel like anything more than I wrote would mislead people into thinking what happens is more predictable than it actually is. –  Zack May 14 '13 at 21:32
    
@Zack: Well, it's sufficient to say what Kerrek said: "Don't do this because you can't count on it". But IMHO explaining what actually happens in practice provides fascinating insight into "how stuff works" and that's way more valuable knowledge. –  Jon May 14 '13 at 21:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Function parameters are passed depending on the C ABI used by the compiler. This can mean they are passed on the stack or in registers or in a combination of both. I believe that 32-bit Intel systems commonly pass in the stack while 64-bit Intel pass mostly in registers with the overflow going on the stack.

Where do the random values for unpassed arguments come from? They come from the register or stack position that should have held the value. The called function does not know that the argument wasn't passed so it pulls it anyway.

If all of the arguments are supposed to be on the stack this can lead to bad problems because the function will pull off more stack items than exist. In the worst case it will wipe out the function return address.

When using registers it isn't much of a problem except for the random value.

From the above information you should be able to gather that it isn't supported and you shouldn't do it and in general it won't work.

What will work is variable argument lists. For example, printf does it. So does the open() POSIX function. The open declaration looks like the following:

extern int open (__const char *__file, int __oflag, ...);

See the triple dot? That declares a variable argument list. It can contain 0 to any number of arguments. They are accessed using special functions. The only way to know how many arguments to expect is one of the previous arguments. In the case of open(), the oflag value. For printf() the format string.

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What happens to the stack would depend on the calling convention of the function. In all cases, I think, it could lead to disaster. –  anthony-arnold May 15 '13 at 1:01

Where are these values originating from?

Generally they will be memory or register garbage from previous operations.

Additionaly, how are arguments passed to functions?

It depends on the platform ABI; generally either in a designated set of registers or at fixed offsets from a "stack pointer".

Is it bad practice to not pass arguments?

Yes. It triggers "undefined behavior"; the compiler is entitled to crash your program the moment you do it, or worse.

Can one be prepared for additions to a function's arguments without recompiling code utilizing the function? (example: a dynamically loaded library's function gains an accepted argument but code utilizing the function isn't going to be recompiled).

No. Whenever you change the argument list of a C function that is part of a library ABI you must also change its name. (There are tricks you can pull to hide this in the source-level API, but they are all veneers over the fundamental tactic of changing the function's name.)

In C++ of course the changed argument list is a new overload, but that's implemented by the compiler changing the name for you.

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It is more correct to say that the C standard does not support adding parameters to a function definition without changing callers than to say that one cannot do it. It is possible in many implementations, either by using assembly or by using known properties of the specific C implementation, provided there is some way for the called function to know how many parameters were passed (either by information given in the early parameters or by features of the ABI). –  Eric Postpischil May 14 '13 at 21:34

Calling a function with too few arguments is extremely dangerous. Under most ABIs, the stack slots for arguments are not call-preserved, meaning the compiler is free to generate for a function code which overwrites this portion of the stack. If the caller was not aware of the actual number of arguments the callee expects, and thus did not leave sufficient space for them, the callee will happily clobber the caller's local storage, possibly even including the return address.

On some architectures/ABIs with pass-by-register this does not apply until you exceed the number of arguments passed in registers, but on other pass-by-register systems (MIPS comes to mind), argument slots on the stack are reserved (and the callee is free to clobber them) even for arguments that are passed in registers.

In short, don't call functions with the wrong number or type of arguments. It's undefined for very good reasons.

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In all computing environments, function arguments are collected and arranged in sequential memory somewhere—commonly on the CPU stack, but for some architectures it could be in a sequence of CPU registers—or a combination of registers and memory.

Only a few CPUs provide a mechanism for a called function to determine and verify the number of parameters passed to it. The VAX CPU is a major example.

Most architectures rely on the programmer doing the right thing: if a function is declared to accept three parameters, then wherever that function is called, there had better be (at least) three parameters. If there is not, the C standard says you will get "undefined behavior". In your specific case, whatever happens to have last been written to where the third parameter should have been placed is what you get. For gcc/Linux on an x86, it will be CPU stack memory.

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Where are these values originating from?

The compiler sets up a call before it is made. When a function is entered, it knows how to locate its parameters and where to store its return values. Specifically, the compiler has a specification which allows it to say "Ok. Given the function signature, I can expect this parameter in this register" or if parameters are passed on the stack "by offsetting the current stack position by N bytes". This is based on the calling conventions specified by the architecture's ABI (Application Binary Interface). So the parameters may be stored in registers and/or on the stack, and a place for the return value is also reserved. The function also knows the current position on the stack.

So the function simply reads the parameters from where it expects them to exist. Generally, the parameters you have not passed are garbage values read from the registers or the stack, which were not written to prior to the call. Note that your function could not only read these values, but write them.

Additionaly, how are arguments passed to functions?

The compiler just writes them to the register or stack area specified by the ABI.

Is it bad practice to not pass arguments?

Yes. The exception to this is a va list (dangerous beasts in their own right): int foo(int a, ...);, where the function specifies its expectation using mechanisms such as sentinels and format specifiers.

Can one be prepared for additions to a function's arguments without recompiling code utilizing the function? (example: a dynamically loaded library's function gains an accepted argument but code utilizing the function isn't going to be recompiled).

The C function could be located dynamically and called (It would fail for C++, btw). Therefore, it is generally best to consider signatures of shipped APIs frozen when loaded dynamically or linked to a static image which is out of sync with the header visible to your translations.

Now, you can fake some of this and get it to work, but it is typically a bad idea because one minor slip and you can introduce undefined behavior.

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