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If I have:

function firstFunction(){
    var counter = 0;
    secondFunction();
    secondFunction();
    secondFunction();
    secondFunction();
}
function secondFunction(){
    counter++;
}

I get an error because of the local scope of the variable, but how else am I to do something like this without using global variables?

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1  
Pass a parameter? –  Yuriy Galanter May 14 '13 at 21:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One way is to use a closure:

(function() {
    var counter = 0;

    function firstFunction() {
        secondFunction();
        secondFunction();
        secondFunction();
        secondFunction();
    }

    function secondFunction() {
        counter++;
    }
})();

Alternately, you could pass in the value of counter to secondFunction, like this:

function firstFunction() {
    var counter = 0;
    counter = secondFunction(counter);
    counter = secondFunction(counter);
    counter = secondFunction(counter);
    counter = secondFunction(counter);
}

function secondFunction(counter) {
    return ++counter;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's cool, can I still call firstFunction() from wherever else in my code? –  watson May 14 '13 at 21:51
1  
As long as "wherever else" is within the closure, yes. If you wanted to call the function from outside the closure, add this line to the end of the closure: window.firstFunction = firstFunction; –  Elliot Bonneville May 14 '13 at 21:52
    
As long as "wherever else" is within scope, whether or not a closure exists. –  Beetroot-Beetroot May 14 '13 at 22:08
    
True, that's true. I just assumed that was obvious, though. –  Elliot Bonneville May 14 '13 at 22:09
3  
No, nothing is obvious. –  Beetroot-Beetroot May 14 '13 at 22:10

Use Object to pass counter by reference

   function firstFunction() {

        var myObj = new Object();
        myObj.counter = 0;

        secondFunction(myObj);
        secondFunction(myObj);
        secondFunction(myObj);
        secondFunction(myObj);

    }

    function secondFunction(obj) {
        obj.counter++;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
You needn't use an object to pass counter along. –  Elliot Bonneville May 14 '13 at 21:58
1  
@ElliotBonneville Isn't passing just counter, passes it by value and change doesn't persist outside the function? –  Yuriy Galanter May 14 '13 at 22:00
    
Yeah, that's right. To get around that you could return counter. However, I must say, I do like this code pattern. I haven't seen it before. However, I would recommend using an object literal instead: var counterHolder = {counter: 0}; –  Elliot Bonneville May 14 '13 at 22:01
    
Please, don't use explicit constructor calls for objects that have a literal notation: new Object();, new Object(123); and new Object('a string'); might return something unexpected... much like new Array(2) vs new Array('2') or new Array(2,3,1) –  Elias Van Ootegem May 14 '13 at 22:14
    
@Bergi Please DO NOT edit my code for anything but aesthetics and format. If you don't agree with it - comment on it or downvote it. But what was here after your edit - was not my solution. –  Yuriy Galanter May 14 '13 at 23:25

Since primitive types (such as integers and strings) in javascript are passed by value, but objects are passed by reference, you need to use an object:

// passing primitive type
var counter = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < 4; ++i) { 
    secondFunction(counter);
}
alert(counter); // 0
function secondFunction(counter) {
    counter++;
}

// passing object
var obj = { counter: 0 }
for (var i = 0; i < 4; ++i) { 
    secondFunction(obj);
}
alert(obj.counter); // 4
function secondFunction(obj) {
    obj.counter++;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/MpVqQ/2/

This way you can achieve what you want without using global variables.

share|improve this answer
2  
everything is passed by value in JS, no variable ever holds an object. The value of your variable obj isn't the object literal, it's value is a reference. Also: functions are objects, and every function call creates a call-object (which holds the scope), that's a far better, safer and more controlled way to go about your business 99.99% of the time –  Elias Van Ootegem May 14 '13 at 22:12
2  
In your example you forgot to pass the object, you could have used a primitive variable as well :-) –  Bergi May 14 '13 at 22:18
    
Yeah, true, fixed it :) –  Chelios May 15 '13 at 5:10

As an addition to Elliot Bonneville's answer, you can also do this:

var firstFunction = (function()
{
    var counter = 0,
    secondFunction = function
    {
        counter++;
    };
    return function()
    {
        counter = 0;//initialize counter to 0
        secondFunction();
        return counter;
    };
};
console.log(firstFunction());//logs 1, because counter was set to 1 and returned

This is all getting a bit much, but google "JavaScript module pattern" and look into it. You'll soon find out what makes this code tick:

var counterModule = (function()
{
    var counter = 0,
    secondFunction = function
    {
        counter++;
    },
    firstFunction = function()
    {
        counter = 0;//initialize counter to 0
        secondFunction();
    },
    getCounter = function()
    {
        return counter;
    }
    setCounter = function(val)
    {
        counter = +(val);
    };
    return {firstFunction: firstFunction,
            getCounter: getCounter,
            setCounter: setCounter};
};
console.log(counterModule.firstFunction());//undefined
console.log(counterModule.getCounter());//1
console.log(counterModule.secondFunction());//ERROR

It's all about exposure of certain closure variables... Keep working at it, this is an important pattern to understand, I promise!

share|improve this answer
    
Why the down-vote... as always: I don't mind, provided the DV'er explains what's wrong with my answer –  Elias Van Ootegem May 15 '13 at 11:56

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