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Is this how one can use the the "extra" memory allocated while using the C struct hack?

Questions:

I have a C struct hack implementation below. My question is how can I use the "extra" memory that I have allocated with the hack. Can someone please give me an example on using that extra memory ?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{

    struct mystruct {

        int len;
        char chararray[1];

    };

    struct mystruct *ptr = malloc(sizeof(struct mystruct) + 10 - 1);
    ptr->len=10;


    ptr->chararray[0] = 'a';
    ptr->chararray[1] = 'b';
    ptr->chararray[2] = 'c';
    ptr->chararray[3] = 'd';
    ptr->chararray[4] = 'e';
    ptr->chararray[5] = 'f';
    ptr->chararray[6] = 'g';
    ptr->chararray[7] = 'h';
    ptr->chararray[8] = 'i';
    ptr->chararray[9] = 'j';


}
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2  
Can you give us a little more context? What is the c struct hack? What is your actual question? –  Robert Harvey May 14 '13 at 22:00
1  
@RobertHarvey I believe extending the array to 9 elements from 1 element. –  Lews Therin May 14 '13 at 22:01
1  
@RobertHarvey Faking a flexible array member by declaring an array of length 1 at the end. Before flexible array members were added in C99, that was the way to have structs with arrays of varying (and runtime-determined) length. (Undefined behaviour, though.) But I suspect yours was a rhetorical question. –  Daniel Fischer May 14 '13 at 22:03
1  
@RobertHarvey its scary when you first see it, but in practice it works quite well. –  Keith Nicholas May 14 '13 at 22:09
3  
@RobertHarvey It was so widely used that no compiler could afford breaking it. But it always was explicitly undefined behaviour according to the standard [well, obviously not before the first standard]. Now we have flexible array members standardized, so the struct hack should follow the dodo. –  Daniel Fischer May 14 '13 at 22:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Yes, that is (and was) the standard way in C to create and process a variably-sized struct.

That example is a bit verbose. Most programmers would handle it more deftly:

struct mystruct {
        int len;
        char chararray[1];  // some compilers would allow [0] here
    };
    char *msg = "abcdefghi";
    int n = strlen (msg);

    struct mystruct *ptr = malloc(sizeof(struct mystruct) + n + 1);

    ptr->len = n;
    strcpy (ptr->chararray, msg);
}
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3  
It was. The standard way now is to use a flexible array member. –  Daniel Fischer May 14 '13 at 22:05
1  
@LewsTherin see stackoverflow.com/questions/246977/… –  Alok Singhal May 14 '13 at 22:11
2  
@LewsTherin struct foo { int length; other_type other_member; double flexible_array_member[]; };. –  Daniel Fischer May 14 '13 at 22:12
1  
@abc: That is correct. However, this is also frequently a potential source of bugs when someone half-aware changes part of it without recognizing the dependency of the other part. –  wallyk May 14 '13 at 22:14
1  
s/int/size_t/g; –  Chris Lutz May 14 '13 at 22:20

Ever since I read this article (http://blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2004/08/26/220873.aspx), I've liked to use the struct hack like so:

  #include<stdio.h>
  #include<stdlib.h>

  int main()
  {

      struct mystruct {

          int len;
          char chararray[1];
      };

      int number_of_elements = 10;

      struct mystruct *ptr = malloc(offsetof(struct mystruct, chararray[number_of_elements]));
      ptr->len = number_of_elements;

      for (i = 0; i < number_of_elements; ++i) {
        ptr->chararray[i] = 'a' + i;
      }

  }

I find that not having to remember whether 1 needs to be subtracted (or added or whatever) is nice. This also has the bonus of working in situations where 0 is used in the array definition, which not all compilers support but some do. If the allocation is based on offsetof() you don't need to worry about that possible detail making your math wrong.

It also works without change is the struct is a C99 flexible array member.

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1  
It is hard to look past the statement that C99 allows 0-sized arrays in this blog post though (C99 has the crucial word “nonempty” in 6.2.5:20). It is also standardized that the size of an array of size n is n times the size of the element, and the standard implicitly assumes that the size of an object is never zero in a couple of places (though GCC took the risk to allow zero-sized arrays as an extension. I don't understand how they accepted that risk, but perhaps if it's only ever at the end of a struct, it's okay) –  Pascal Cuoq May 14 '13 at 22:36
    
I think the mention in the article about zero length arrays not being legal until C99 is a somewhat imprecise combination of making clear that it's not legal in C90 and that C99 permits incomplete arrays types at the end of a struct (which is not too much of stretch from zero-sized arrays even if it's not precisely that). –  Michael Burr May 14 '13 at 22:51

I would advise against that due to possible alignment issues instead consider this:

struct my_struct
{
    char *arr_space;
    unsigned int len;
}

struct my_struct *ptr = malloc(sizeof(struct my_struct) + 10);
ptr->arr_space = ptr + 1;
ptr->len = 10;

This will give you locality as well as safety :) and avoid weird alignment issues.

By alignment issues I meant possible access delays for accessing unaligned memory.

In the original example if you add a byte or non word aligned member (byte, char, short) then the compiler may extend the size of the structure but as far as your pointer is concerned you are reading the memory directly after the end of the struct (non aligned). This means if you have an array of an aligned type such as int every access will net you a performance hit on CPUs that take hits from reading unaligned memory.

struct
{
    byte_size data;
    char *var_len;
    some_align added by compiler;
}

In the original case you will be reading from the some_align region which is just filler but in my case you will read from aligned extra memory afterwards (which wastes some space but that's typically okay).

Another benefit of doing this is that it's possible to get more locality from allocations by allocating all the space for variable length members of a struct in one allocation rather than allocating them separately (avoids multiple allocation call overheads and gives you some cache locality rather than bouncing all over memory).

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4  
char arrays do not have any alignment requirements -- they can be aligned on any boundary. –  Adam Rosenfield May 14 '13 at 22:03
3  
@AhmedMasud : How can int len; ever be misaligned when it's before the variable sized section? –  Roddy May 14 '13 at 22:10
3  
@Jesus: sorry, no: the last element in the struct is an array of size 1. It is already correctly aligned. If you allocate space for additional elements then these elements too will be correctly aligned. –  Paul R May 14 '13 at 22:13
3  
@JesusRamos - but that's still not an aligment issue. That's just a different problem. –  Roddy May 14 '13 at 22:17
2  
@JesusRamos: A flexible array member can only be the last member of a struct; likewise for the older "struct hack". –  Keith Thompson May 14 '13 at 22:52

It is 'correct', but you'd need a good reason to do that over a more reasonable solution. More commonly perhaps you'd use this technique to "overlay" some existing array to impose some sort of header structure on to it.

Note that GCC by extension allows a zero length array member for exactly this purpose, while ISO C99 "legitimises" the practice by allowing a member with empty brackets (only as the last member).

Note that there are some semantic issues - sizeof the struct will not of course account for the "flexible" size of the final member, and passing the struct "by value" will only pass the header and first element (or no element using the GCC extension or C99 flexible array member). Similarly direct struct assignment will not copy all the data.

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