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I'm starting out with EF and MVC, and following different tutorials provide different confusing ideas on where is the correct place to put dummy test data in my database.

So I've made some POCO classes, I have a BlahContext

public class BlahContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Blah> Blahs { get; set; }

    public BlahContext() : base("DefaultConnection")
    {
        Configuration.ProxyCreationEnabled = false;
    }
}

Then in Global.asax.cs I initialize the database like this:

protected void Application_Start()
{
    Database.SetInitializer(new DropCreateDatabaseAlways<BlahContext>());
}

Now I did the following in Package Manager Console:

PM>  enable-migrations -contexttypename Blah.Models.BlahContext
PM>  add-migration Initial
PM>  update-database

This created Configuration.cs, and in that class there is a Seed() method - the generated comments imply that this is the correct place to put seed data. So I filled it in like this:

internal sealed class Configuration : DbMigrationsConfiguration<Blah.Models.BlahContext>
{
    public Configuration()
    {
        AutomaticMigrationsEnabled = false;
    }

    protected override void Seed(Blah.Models.BlahContext context)
    {
#if DEBUG
        context.Blahs.AddOrUpdate(b => b.ID,
            new Blah() { ID = 1, Name = "bum", },
            new Blah() { ID = 2, Name = "moo", }
        );
#endif
    }
}

Now when I run update-database again, it populates the Blah table with the 2 records "bum" and "moo". All good.

But when I run the application, it seems the Database.SetInitializer() call in Application_Start causes the database to be recreated, but this time the Configuration.Seed() method is not called. So the data is no longer present.

I saw some other tutorials which created a class such as:

class BlahContextInitializer : DropCreateDatabaseAlways<BlahContext>

and then Application_Start looks like:

protected void Application_Start()
{
    Database.SetInitializer(new BlahContextInitializer());
}

And then in the BlahContextInitializer.Seed() method that's where the dummy data is contained. Is this strategy for EF4.1 only?

Where should I put my seed data in EF5 so that it doesn't get wiped out when the application starts?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

But when I run the application, it seems the Database.SetInitializer() call in Application_Start causes the database to be recreated, but this time the Configuration.Seed() method is not called. So the data is no longer present.

You should use MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion initializer if you're using migrations.
Or skip initializer all together - if you plan on manually migrating Db (using Update-Database).

Problem is that you have two different initializers (or initialization scenarios to be precise) trying to work together. That have totally different 'plans'. It's problem with any other but especially with DropCreateDatabaseAlways and that has no way of working.

Have in mind that Migration Seed runs with each start of the application, so it's a bit different (than 'typical' seed).


If you have some complex scenarios (that really require you having a typical 'Seed' with your initializer (like it was done before) - then see this post of mine on how to create a custom initializer like that...

What is the correct use of IDatabaseInitializer in EF?

How to create initializer to create and migrate mysql database?

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I didn't realise that I could skip initializer if using "update-database". Also I never knew about MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion, it looks like it should work, I'll give it a try. –  demoncodemonkey May 15 '13 at 9:08
    
MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion did the trick. Thanks! –  demoncodemonkey May 16 '13 at 23:12
    
you're welcome friend –  NSGaga May 16 '13 at 23:13

Thanks to @NSGaga, here's what I ended up with:

protected void Application_Start()
{
    Database.SetInitializer(
        new MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion<BlahContext, Blah.Migrations.Configuration>()
    );
}

This both updates the database and then calls the Configuration.Seed() as expected.

Now if I change my model, I still need to run add-migration SomeChange but I don't need to bother with update-database anymore. Whenever I run the application it automatically updates the DB.

Also because it's migrating instead of recreating the database, it doesn't wipe out any extra data there, so it can be used for production databases (which was another of my worries for using EF CF)

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You can put the seeded data in the "BlahContextInitializer". You have it set to drop and recreate the database on build so this will erase all the data and then insert it back into the tables. If you want it to seed it once either change the DropCreateDatabaseAlways to a different setting or comment out the initializer from the global.asax after you initially seeded the data.

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I saw that method but that means there is a BlahContextInitializer.Seed() as well as Configuration.Seed(). Since my EF5 project generated the Configuration.Seed() when I used "enable-migrations", I guessed the BlahContextInitializer.Seed() was an EF4.1 thing. –  demoncodemonkey May 15 '13 at 9:03
    
I suppose. Using the Configuration.Seed() if it was generated would be your best bet. –  Robert Pallin May 15 '13 at 14:41

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