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I found another question very similar to mine with a solution that worked for me when I wrote it all in one simple script. I even wrote a second simple example sort of simulating what I'm trying to do, and it seemed to still work.

My simulation was:

class A
  def looper(&block)
    Thread.new do
      loop do
        exit if gets.chomp == 'q'
      end
    end
    loop do
      block.call
    end
  end
end

class B < A
  def looper
    super do
      puts 'howddyyyy from B'
    end
  end
end

This works fine, exiting when you press q<Enter>. However, when I tried to implement this into my actual project, it fails to work. I'll post the code from the method in question in the child class, as the parent class is literally exactly the same as the example above.

def looper
  super do
    if obj = Object.first(:process_status => STATUS_UNPROCESSED)
      puts "[Object ##{obj.id}] Processing..."
      puts "-" * 60

      obj.set_failed
      if @obj.process(obj)
        obj.set_processed
      end

      puts "-" * 60
      puts "[Object ##{obj.id}] Finished!"
      puts
      puts
    else
      sleep 10
    end
  end
end

So, for some reason, this doesn't work. I put a puts into the new Thread (listening for q), and it seems to output the puts before every loop of block.call. Maybe it just isn't able to get the key, by which I mean, maybe the timeframe in which you have to enter q<Enter> is way too small? I'm not sure, which is why I'm asking some advice here. My only other guess is that it has something to do with the methods called within this method (process, or possible the Sequel calls to the database) blocking the other thread(s)?

I'm new to threading, so I have no clue.

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Whenever you have a well defined exit condition from a loop you should use a while or until construction. And do you really want to exit the program? Or just end the loop? Ending a program should be left to whatever is using your library, I would think. –  vgoff May 14 '13 at 23:18
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1 Answer

Okay, everybody. I feel a little stupid for typing all that up, as I came to a solution not five minutes later (and one I had overlooked here on Stack Overflow).

For anyone facing a similar issue in the future, this is what I ended up doing (in the parent class):

def looper(&block)
  interrupted = false
  trap("INT") { interrupted = true }
  until interrupted do
    block.call
  end
  exit
end

This manages to achieve what I was essentially trying to do.

Thanks for reading!

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