Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I try to make a class to manage resources easily (ResourceManager).

For that I use the template with C++11.

Here's what I do:


template<class K,class T>
class ResourceManager
{
    public:
        ResourceManager();
        ~ResourceManager();

        /* code */

        void clear();

    private : 
        std::unordered_map<K,T> resource;

        template <bool b>
        void clear();
};

 template<class K,class T>
 void ResourceManager<K,T>::clear()
 {
    clear<std::is_pointer<T>::value>();
 };

 template<class K,class T>
 template<bool b>
 void ResourceManager<K,T>::clear<b>()
 {
    for(auto& x:resource)
    delete x.second;
    resource.clear();
 }

 template<class K,class T>
 template<>
 void ResourceManager<K,T>::clear<false>()
 {
    resource.clear();
 }

In short, I try to have different comportement if T is a pointer (auto delete).

I tried to use std::enable_if, but I did not understand how it functioned, and if this is the right way to take.

If someone could help me...


Code can be found here: https://github.com/Krozark/ResourceManager

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You could just use a solution based on overload and tag dispatching. Your clear() member function would be defined this way:

void clear()
{
    do_clear(std::is_pointer<T>());
}

And your class template would include two overloads of do_clear(), as follows:

template<class K,class T>
class ResourceManager
{

    // ...

private:

    void do_clear(std::true_type);
    void do_clear(std::false_type);

};

And here is the definition of those two member functions:

template<class K, class T>
void ResourceManager<K, T>::do_clear(std::true_type)
{
    for(auto& x:resource)
    delete x.second;
    resource.clear();
}

template<class K, class T>
void ResourceManager<K, T>::do_clear(std::false_type)
{
    resource.clear();
}

Notice, however, that you always have the option of using smart pointers and other RAII resource wrappers to avoid calling delete explicitly on raw pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I wanted to do. Thank you. –  Krozark May 14 '13 at 23:22
4  
@Krozark: Glad it helped. I added an advice: consider using RAII wrappers such as smart pointers, so you do not have to care about the delete part at all ;) –  Andy Prowl May 14 '13 at 23:23
    
+1 nice solution, Andy. –  WhozCraig May 14 '13 at 23:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.