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print "1) Add"
print "2) Substract"
print "3) Multiply"
print "4) Divide"
print "5) Exit"

x=input("Choose an operation: ")
y=input("How many numbers do you need to operate: ")
op=1
lista=[]

while y>0:
    a=input("Value"+" "+str(op)+": ")
    litlist=[a]
    lista=lista+litlist
    y=y-1
    op=op+1

while x!=5:
    if x==1:
        b=0
        for n in lista:
            b=b+n
        print b
    elif x==2:
        b=0
        for n in lista:
            if lista[0]==n:
                b=b+n
            else:
                b=b-n
        print b
    elif x==3:
        b=1
        for n in lista:
            b=b*n
        print b
    elif x==4:
        b=1
        for n in lista:
            if lista[0]==n:
                b=b*n
            else:
                b=b/float(n)
        print b

This program is designed to:

  • First ask which operation the user wants to do
  • Then ask how many numbers need to be operated
  • Input the numbers
  • And finally print the result

I want it ask which operation needs to be done, how many numbers need to be operated again after printing the result. then input the numbers and so on.

I know that I can use another input in the while to make it ask numbers again and stop the loop but there is two whiles and that doesnt allow me to ask Y again, just X. So it would be cool to be able to go back to line 6 and start over
Thanks for your answers :)

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2  
Based off of your print statements, I am assuming you are using Python 2.x. If that is the case, it is better practice to use raw_input (returns a string) instead of input (evaluates user input as Python code), and then convert the string to whatever is needed. –  F3AR3DLEGEND May 14 '13 at 23:46
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closed as too localized by Andy Hayden, plaes, Juan Mellado, Soner Gönül, tkanzakic May 15 '13 at 6:52

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're looking for a goto statement. Back in 1968, Dijkstra wrote a famous paper called Go To Statement Considered Harmful that explained why you should not be looking for goto.

The right thing to do is structure your code.

The simplest change is this:

print "1) Add"
print "2) Substract"
print "3) Multiply"
print "4) Divide"
print "5) Exit"
while True:
    x=input("Choose an operation: ")
    # ...

However, you can do better. Take isolated pieces of code and separate them into functions that you can call. If two (or, in your case, four) pieces of code are nearly identical, abstract them into a single function that takes a parameter, instead of repeating the same code four times. And so on.

But really, even without any functions, you can get rid of most of the repetition:

import operator

print "1) Add"
print "2) Substract"
print "3) Multiply"
print "4) Divide"
print "5) Exit"
while True:
    x=input("Choose an operation: ")
    if x==5:
        break
    y=input("How many numbers do you need to operate: ")
    operands=[input('Value {}'.format(i+1)) for i in range(count)]
    if x==1:
        op, value = operator.add, 0
    elif x==2:
        op, value = operator.sub, 0
    elif x==3:
        op, value = operator.mul, 1
    elif x==4:
        op, value = operator.truediv, 1
    for operand in operands:
        value = op(value, operand)
    print value

The only reason I had to import operator above was to get those add, sub, etc. functions. These are trivial, so you could write them yourself:

def add(x, y):
    return x+y
# etc.

Then, instead of this:

op, value = operator.add, 0

… do this:

op, value = add, 0

… and the same for the other three.

Or you can define them in-place with lambda:

op, value = (lambda x, y: x+y), 0

Still, you shouldn't do either of these. As simple as defining add, sub, mul, and truediv is, it's even simpler to not define them. Python comes with "batteries included" for a reason, and if you're avoiding using them, you're making your life (and the lives of anyone who has to read, maintain, etc. your code) harder for absolutely no reason.

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1  
A very, very minor nitpick is that Dijkstra's preferrence to use recursion is a poor fit for python (due to limitations in python itself), but his remarks still stand, and python provides many alternatives which really mean that 'goto' is completely unneccessary. –  Arafangion May 14 '13 at 23:53
    
@Arafangion: Yes, good point. Dijkstra's paper (along with Böhm-Jacopini and the incessant attempts to "fix" ALGOL) is what led to the 70s-style imperative-structural programming, so it's not too surprising that he didn't take that style into account… but it's important to note that Python inherits at least as much from that style as it does from functional-recursive. –  abarnert May 15 '13 at 0:02
    
Thanks, but i'd like to dont use a library. I found a command called execfile which allow me to exec a script from another script and it allow me to finish my script and now it works. What do you think? –  Michael May 15 '13 at 2:55
    
@Michael: What's wrong with using libraries? The "batteries included" are one of the major advantages of Python over other languages (and operator is one of those—it comes with Python). But I can edit my answer to show you how to do it without any import statements. –  abarnert May 15 '13 at 22:34
    
@Michael: Without knowing what you're trying to do with execfile, or seeing your code, it's hard to give any specifics. But I can say this: If you're using execfile, you're doing it wrong. There are some very specialized good uses for it, but I'd bet good money you haven't come across one. Create a new question explaining what you're trying to do, showing your execfile code, and asking for a better way to accomplish the same thing, and someone will give you a good answer. –  abarnert May 15 '13 at 22:37
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Python does not allow you to go back to a specific line number, and even if it did, you should not take advantage of that capability because it results in unmaintainable programs.

Instead, learn how to use functions and structure your code so that functions make sense.

Eg, something like:

def get_number_of_operations():
    return input("How many numbers do you need to operate: ")

Then you can repeat that block of code in the function again by calling the function, eg:

y = get_number_of_operations()
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