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I am working on a project and I am stuck. I have two variables that generate random numbers. I want to do a check that checks to make sure the variables are not the same number, and if they are, then repeat the process until they are not the same. Here is what I have :

num_enemy = 3;

int f =  rand() % num_enemy;
int m =  rand() % num_enemy;

if ( f != m )
{
enemy_ptr[f] -> fire_Weapon();
enemy_ptr[m] -> update_Status();
}

The code above wont work plus how can I make it so that if its false it will generate the random numbers again?

I am not looking for answers, just assistance on what exactly I need to do. Thanks!

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2  
You're looking for a loop. –  chris May 15 '13 at 5:10
    
While loops are too much of an accepted answer, use recursive function just because you can :D –  Chris Condy May 15 '13 at 5:28
1  
c'mon, he wants do to it at least once - finally a time for my beloved do{}while(); loop! wheeeee –  gha.st May 15 '13 at 6:43

6 Answers 6

The problem is that when it gets to this section...

if ( f != m )
{
    enemy_ptr[f] -> fire_Weapon();
    enemy_ptr[m] -> update_Status();
}

... the variables f and m could have the same value, due to the modulo, so your fire_Weapon() and update_Status() functions are never called. You will need to loop until both variables have different values. The code below should sort you out.

const int num_enemy = 3;
int f = rand() % num_enemy;
int m;

// A do-while loop is guaranteed to be called at least once.
do
{
    m = rand() % num_enemy;
} while ( f == m ); // Repeat the loop if the values are the same

// At this point, f and m will always have different values.
enemy_ptr[f] -> fire_Weapon();
enemy_ptr[m] -> update_Status();

Because your variables are modulo with a low value, it's possible the loop may have to run many times before f != m.

Also, if you want the sequence of pseudo-random numbers returned by rand() to be different each time the game is run, seed the psuedo-random number generator with a call to srand( time() ) once. If you want the sequence to be constant each time you run the game leave it as is. This can greatly help with debugging, and is required if your game needs to be deterministic.

Read more about rand() and srand() here: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdlib/rand/

As mentioned in another answer, C++11 has improved random number generation. Find out more here: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/random/

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1  
This is functionally equivalent to @vdua's answer, but much cleaner in my opinion. Always remember to call srand before this code is encountered though, or else you'll hit an infinite loop. –  anthony-arnold May 15 '13 at 5:19
1  
@anthony-arnold, Not correct. srand() is not required for rand() to function correctly. –  DrTwox May 15 '13 at 5:45

"The code above won't work" is a little vague. I guess you mean that f == m every time?

In that case you may have forgotten to seed the RNG. See the documentation for srand. Or better yet, use the new c++ Random Library for pseudo-random number generators.

As for how to regenerate the random numbers when f == m... are you aware of while loops? It would be a good idea to read up on control structures and simple c++ syntax.

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A call to srand() is not required for rand() to function correctly. –  DrTwox May 15 '13 at 5:47
    
@DrTwox How do you figure? –  anthony-arnold May 15 '13 at 5:52
    
cplusplus.com/reference/cstdlib/rand "Returns a pseudo-random integral number in the range between 0 and RAND_MAX. This number is generated by an algorithm that returns a sequence of apparently non-related numbers each time it is called." Go try it and see :) –  DrTwox May 15 '13 at 5:58
    
If you want rand to generate seemingly-random numbers through every run and you don't call srand, you're doing it wrong. –  anthony-arnold May 15 '13 at 6:17
    
Correct, but you don't HAVE to call srand() before rand() for it to work, and sometimes you do want the sequence to be random within each run, but the same (predictable) for every run. –  DrTwox May 15 '13 at 6:35

one solution is

num_enemy = 3;

int f =  rand() % num_enemy;
int m =  rand() % num_enemy;
while(f==m) {
    f = rand() % num_enemy;
    //m = rand() % num_enemy;
}
enemy_ptr[f] -> fire_Weapon();
enemy_ptr[m] -> update_Status();

But you should read Reservoir sampling to learn how to select k numbers randomly from a set. you can have an array of integers from 1 to num_enemy. Then select two numbers randomly from this array. It's an order n solution and if your array is small, it would work great.

EDIT: based on the comment edited the code

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2  
You don't need to replace both random numbers in the loop - replacing one of them is enough. –  Steve314 May 15 '13 at 5:32

If you think about it, you can ensure that the second random number will be different than the first by picking from a pool of one less possibility:

num_enemy = 3;

int f =  rand() % num_enemy;

// pick another non-zero number from a pool that's smaller by one than before
int next_offset =  1 + (rand() % (num_enemy-1));

// add it to the previous result (modulo the range)
int m = (f + next_offset) % num_enemy;

assert( 0 <= f && f < num_enemy);
assert( 0 <= m && m < num_enemy);
assert( f != m );

enemy_ptr[f] -> fire_Weapon();
enemy_ptr[m] -> update_Status();

Of course, because rand() isn't necessarily a great RNG and because simply using % to map the random number to a certain range usually introduces a bias, you might want to tweak the implementation of this to deal with those problems if that's important.

And if you prefer the looping solution, there's no need to keep picking both numbers (though I imagine there's not much harm, either):

int f =  rand() % num_enemy;
int m;

do {
    m = rand() % num_enemy;
} while (f == m);
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1  
+1 I also prefer the "one less" approach. For a simpler implementation: int m = rand() % (num_enemy - 1); if (m == f) m = num_enemy - 1;. –  Tony D May 15 '13 at 6:40

If what you want is to repeat something on some condition, what you need is a loop, the construction made for repetition. In this case, since you want to do the thing at least once before checking the condition, I would suggest a do-while loop:

 int f, m;
 do {
   f = rand() % num_enemy;
   m = rand() % num_enemy;
 } while(f == m);

 enemy_ptr[f] -> fire_Weapon();
 enemy_ptr[m] -> update_Status();
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DrTwox said almost the same slightly earlier but this would actually work (you have assignments in the loop, not new variable declarations) so +1 for that. –  Steve314 May 15 '13 at 5:39
num_enemy = 3;

int f =  rand() % num_enemy;
int m =  rand() % (num_enemy-1);
m += (m>=f);

enemy_ptr[f] -> fire_Weapon();
enemy_ptr[m] -> update_Status();

The idea is that whatever number f gets is taken out of the set of possible values for m. Since a value has been removed from the possible set for m, we reduce the number of possible values for m by using % (num_enemy-1), and adjust whatever value is picked for m to be one of the possible values. That is, if m is greater than or equal to the value picked for f, we add one. This is 'cleverly' written as m += (m>=f); because the boolean value gets converted to zero or one.

Also, rand() is not usually a good random number generator, and using mod does not do a good job of producing a uniform distribution in your desired range. You should use the C++11 <random> library.

#include <random>

int num_enemy = 3;

// set up decent random number engine and distributions
std::mt19937 eng;
std::uniform_int_distribution<> f_dist{0, num_enemy-1};
std::uniform_int_distribution<> m_dist{0, num_enemy-2};

int f = f_dist(eng);
int m = m_dist(eng);
m += (m>=f);
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