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I have a site hosted on Windows Azure shared websites. It just got suspended for going over memory usage limit of 512MB/hour.

I do use .net caching rather heavily (to prevent multiple calls to database/external APIs, etc...).

Is that caching a no-no in shared websites on Windows Azure?

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You mean actual memory on the host machine? As in you used more than 512mb of RAM in an hour and are being suspended for it? If so, why not just get a real web-host. Am I missing something? –  Jhawins May 15 '13 at 5:52
    
I was attempting to use windows azure, thinking the site is brand new, not exceptionally busy yet... So would be affordable and ready to scale when needed. Wasn't expecting to hit memory limits so fast. Is that common? Is that basically the bait and switch to get users to upgrade to reserved VM's? –  Chaddeus May 15 '13 at 6:36
    
I honestly am not the person to ask. GoDaddy fits the bill for a cheap secondary server for our business. And a local company trades us a dedicated server for ad credits (Running a publication...). I've never had to deal with any other companies than those two and have actually never heard of memory limits by the hour. It sounds stupid to me, but that's microshaft for ya. –  Jhawins May 15 '13 at 6:50

4 Answers 4

Do you use System.Runtime.Cache? You should be able to limit the amount of caching e.g. the memorycache object uses. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd941874.aspx for more information.

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Might be worth checking a profile using perfmon on your local machine to see if what if its hitting the limits normally first, then look at maybe configuring the logging on Azure and again digging through it.

Also ensuring everything is precompiled and that your not loading and modules etc you don't need can really effect performance etc on Azure.

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Even if you will stop using Cache it still can be used by framework/libs. I also have same problem (interesting, that in free mode memory limit is 1024MB, but shared one is lowered to 512).

As I see, memory amount that Azure shows on portal seems very close to System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().PrivateMemorySize value.

At this moment I'm experimenting with caching settings to set maximum memory:

<system.web>
  <caching>
    <cache privateBytesLimit="250000000" privateBytesPollTime="00:00:15"/>
  </caching>
</system.web>

Several days ago I set 300MB but several minutes ago got suspended again :(, so lowering to 250MB.

But anyway, this is very unclear, strange and "wrong" solution imho.

UPDATE

Got suspended again this morning. Temporarily converted to standard mode with small instance (1.7 GB RAM).

My WorkingSet counter now is about 200 megs now (with PeakWorkingSet 330 megs). BUT! GC's CollectionCount is increased approx 8 times (Gen0 is 1800 times instead of 250 for less that a day).

My current theory is that in "shared" mode websites are running inside "big" VM with a lot of memory and Garbage Collector just not have a need to run often, leading to longer "garbage life" and more memory consumption.

Have no access to my developer computer right now for some verification, but planing to convert site to web role in cloud service ASAP - with extra small instance (cost is comparable to shared web site cost)...

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I think what you might want to try here is scale our instead of up. If you add a second instance that will double your resource limit.

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