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What does this type of notation mean in a logical data model? There is three tables in this diagram and x inside "half moon". So, what is this "x inside half moon". I could not find this e.g. from different diagramming conventions mentioned in Wikipedia.

             _________
            |_________|
            |         |
            |_________|
                 |
                 |  
               -----
              /__x__\
                 |
          _______|_________
    _____|_____        ____|______
   |___________|      |___________|
   |           |      |           |
   |           |      |           |
   |___________|      |___________|
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

It means that the 2 child entities are exclusive subtypes of the parent super type.

This is "Information Engineering" notation

For example, see ERWin notes (at the bottom) http://www.isqa.unomaha.edu/wolcott/tutorials/erwin/erwin.html

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Very well, thank you! – Matkrupp May 15 '13 at 7:07

There is already a correct answer, but I thought the following might be useful to future visitors.

In ER modeling, this pattern is known as "specialization/generalization". In languages like Java, "subtypes" might be known as "subclasses".

When you move from ER modeling to SQL (relational) table design, you will likely be at a loss for a good way to represent this pattern. Introductory material about database design often does not include this pattern, even though it occurs over and over again.

Fortunately, the is a well understood design technique that's useful here. If you visit the tag, and click on "learn more", you'll get an overview of one useful technique and links to two related techniques.

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