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I have a base class Base and 2 derived classes Child_A and Child_B. By the time an object My_Object is instantiated (as a shared pointer), I don't know it's Child_A or Child_B. So it is instantiated as Base. I push My_Object to into a std::vector of shared pointer of Base type. Later when I know which derived class My_Object belongs to, I use .reset() on My_Object to cast it to derived class Child_A. My question is, is the My_Object in vector will also be cast to Child_A? If not, how can I do that? Thanks!

Edit:

obj_array.push_back(std::shared_ptr<Base>(new Base());
container.push_back(obj_array[0]]);
obj_array[0].reset(Child_A());

Will container[0] be cast to Child_A? How can I cast it to Child_A?

EDIT for further clarification of the application: I guess my comment of obj_array can be a vector of shared_ptr falls into my application that I would like to have a master container of obj_array> that holds all the object. Then I have several slave containers Container1 Container2... to holds some of the objects. And I would like to have a master control of any object by modifying master container and the effect is broadcast to all slave containers. In this application, I guess I probably just need a Master vector of <shared_ptr<Base>>, and have several Slave vector of <shared_ptr<shared_ptr<Base>>> or <shared_ptr<Base>*>.

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3  
Are out talking of std::vector? And please show some code, your question is confusing otherwise! –  Basile Starynkevitch May 15 '13 at 7:44
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've just noticed the code you added to the question. SharedPointers doesn't do that.

SharedPointers are "shared" in terms of 'reference counting', not "shared" in terms of "datasharing". "data sharing" in your terms is done by .. pointers. Whatever you want to "share", refer to it by pointer. Then, if you change it, everyone will see the update. But You must change it, not the pointer to it.

That is, here, you want to update the pointer and you want everyone to see the pointer being updated. Therefore, you must held the pointer by pointer.

That is, instead of keeping vector<shared_ptr<Base>>, keep a vector<shared_pointer<Base>*>.

Now, when you want to "globally replace" the object with new instance, you replace the shptr<Base> held by pointer with another one new shptr.

If you don't like raw pointers, yo umay even use vector<shared_pointer<sahred_pointer<Base>> and .reset the inner while leaving the outer untouched. Everyone who ever got a copy of the outer will see the update of inner one.

// obj_array and container are a vector<shared_ptr<Base>*>
// or a vector<shared_ptr<shared_ptr<Base>>>

obj_array.push_back(new std::shared_ptr<Base>(new Base()); // note the 'new'
container.push_back(obj_array[0]]);

(*obj_array[0]) .reset(Child_A()); // note the '*'

obj_array[0] -> reset(Child_A()); // or, just in short

EDIT#2:

After your comment "One additional point, obj_array doesn't have to be a vector of pointer to pointer. It can simply be a vector<shared_ptr<Base>>. Please correct me if I'm wrong":

It depends on what do you want to achieve. You can keep things in vector anyway you like - it only will affect certain scenarious of their usage. Let me now describe a very abstract setup. You have a main container that somehow holds some things. Parts of your application called A,B,C periodically takes those things and performs something on them. Parts B and C sometimes tend to internally remember things for some purpose. Now assume:

  • case 1: vector holds Base* objects,
  • case 2: vector holds shared_ptr<Base> objects,
  • case 3: vector holds Base**
  • case 4: vector holds shptr<shptr<Base>>

Of course there are more cases possible, but let's trim it. Now, your app is running and already has some objects in the main container. Modules A,B,C already processed something, and probably modules B and C already remembered some objects. And now the application came up to a point where it needs to replace 5th item in the main container to a new Bar().

Case 1:

vector is of Base*. Bar of course implements Base, so new Bar() is directly assignable to vector[4]. Of course, you have decide what to do with old element. Delete it or forget? Then, vector[4]=new Bar() is executed, from now on everyone who reads this main vector will see the new object at 5th position.

But, that's not the end of the problem: modules B and C may still know the old object. As the vector's element was Base* (raw pointer), those B/C have copied the raw value of pointer-to-old-object, so the only solution now is to explicitely tell the B and C to also perform replace.

thus, case 1 ends as something like the following code. It is split into three stages: example of initial setup, example of runtime operation, and example of final cleanup.

vector<Base*> vector;
vector.resize( 10 );

///// .... later ....

Base* olditem = vector[ 4 ];
Base* newitem = new Bar();

bool iWillDeleteTheOld = well_somehow_decide();

vector[4] = newitem;
moduleB->updateAfterReplace(olditem, newitem,  iWillDeleteTheOld);
modulec->updateAfterReplace(olditem, newitem,  iWillDeleteTheOld);

if(iWillDeleteTheOld)
   delete olditem;

///// .... later ....

for( ... idx ...)
    delete vector[idx];

vector.resize(0);

The modulesB/C read vector items as Base* and if the cache it - they cache it as such, as Base*.

Please note that this piece of code causes you to write additional function updateAfterReplace in every 'module' that could be still remembering the old object. And you need to orchestrate their internal updateAfterReplace to not ever try to delete the old object in case where you are going to do it here, or else you here will double-delete it and crash really badly. I solved it here by telling them whether iWillDeleteTheOld. If they know that I will do it, they will skip their old object deletion phase. However, if I decide to not delete it (iwilldelete=false) they still may decide to delete it on their own..

But, that's just a problem of a proper ownership management and we do not talk about it here.

Case 2:

vector is of shared_ptr<Base>. Bar of course implements Base, so new Bar() is directly assignable to vector[4] (no change). Of course, you have decide what to do with old element (no change).

(change) But, since you held the pointer as shared_ptr, there's no problem with ownership: you just overwrite/release the pointer, and the shptr will take care of the rest. If anyone uses the object, it will delete it. If it is still used, it will keep it.

Then, vector[4]=new Bar() is executed, from now on everyone who reads this main vector will see the new object at 5th position. (no change)

But, that's not the end of the problem: modules B and C may still know the old object. As the vector's element was sharedptr<Base>, those B/C have copied the shared_ptr-to-old-object, so the only solution now is to explicitely tell the B and C to also perform replace. (no change)

thus, case 2 ends as

vector<shared_ptr<Base>> vector;
vector.resize( 10 );

///// .... later ....

sharedptr<Base> olditem = vector[4];
sharedptr<Base> newitem = new Bar();

vector[4].reset( newitem ); // <- THE LINE

moduleB->updateAfterReplace(olditem, newitem);
modulec->updateAfterReplace(olditem, newitem);

///// .... later ....

vector.resize(0);

The modulesB/C read vector items as sharedptr<Base> and if the cache it - they cache it as such, as sharedptr<Base>. Any reduction to Base* will convert the case to Case1.

Please note how 'decide about deletion' and 'object deletion' and 'i-tell-you-that-i-delete-itis gone. This is the benefit ofsharedptr`. However, I still need to manually update all other caches that might still hold the old object.

This is because THE LINE not only overwrites the shared_ptr, but also performs 'maybe delete' phase: detaches the shared_ptr from the internal reference counting mechanism and if the count drops to zero - deletes the object. The problem is here: it detaches. All other sharedptr that have been copied from the shptr in vector[4] are now forming their own refcounting group and they still remember the old object. They did not update the contents. They just collectively dropped from refcount=3 to refcount=2.

Case 3:

vector is of Base**. Bar of course implements Base, so new Bar() is NOT directly assignable to vector[4]: vector now holds a pointer-to-pointer, so also a extra dereference will be needed (change). Of course, you have decide what to do with old element (no change). Delete it or forget? (no change)

Then, *vector[4]=new Bar() is executed, from now on everyone who reads this main vector will see the new object at 5th position. (no change)

And this is the end of the problem. (change)

thus, case 3 ends as

vector<Base**> vector;
for(int i = 0; i<10; ++i)
   vector.push( new Base* );

///// .... later ....

Base* olditem = * vector[4]; // note the dereference
Base* newitem = new Bar();

bool iWillDeleteTheOld = well_somehow_decide();

* vector[4] = newitem; // note the dereference

if(iWillDeleteTheOld)
   delete olditem;

///// .... later ....

for( ... idx ...)
{
    delete * vector[idx];  // delete the object
    delete vector[idx]; // delete the pointer
}

vector.resize(0);

The modulesB/C read vector items as Base** and if the cache it - they cache it as such, as Base**. Any reduction to Base* will convert the case to Case1.

Firstly, note that now your vector must be fully initialized with pointers. It doesn't need to be done like that, you may do it on the fly, but at both lines "note the dereference" you must be absolutely sure that at vector[nth] there is a properly allocated pointer-to-Base* (so, Base**, so new Base*).

As the vector's element is now Base**, those B/C modules possibly have copied the Base** - not Base*! So, speaking in natural language, modules B/C now remember where the pointer lies and not where the object lies. If you change the pointer to point elsewhere, they will immediatelly see it, because they first look at the place-where-pointer-lies, and they will find there .. the new version of pointer.

That way, the cascaded update evaporated, and also object ownership/deletion simplified, but still is present. But! also, new fragments appeared: as you had to allocate extra pointers, you will also have to delete them at some point.

Case 4:

vector<sharedptr<sharedptr<Base>>> vector;
for(int i = 0; i<10; ++i)
   vector.push( new sharedptr<Base> );

///// .... later ....

(* vector[4] ).reset( new Bar() ); // note the dereference

///// .... later ....

vector.resize(0);

The modulesB/C read vector items as sharedptr<sharedptr<Base>> and if the cache it - they cache it as such, as sharedptr<sharedptr<Base>>. Any reduction to Base* or sharedptr<Base> will convert the case to Case1 or Case2, respectively.

I hope that you get all the differences by now, so I will not repeat the details of what happens here.


disclaimer: all examples are just explanatory. none of this code was tested, none of this code is "complete". there's for example lots of error checking missing. they are meant just to show the skeleton of the mechanisms. they may even don't compile due to typos and etc.

Final word #1: of course, you may mix the pointers and shared pointers freely. Instead of shared_ptr<shared_ptr<Base>>, you can use shared_ptr<Base*> or shared_ptr<Base>* or Base** as already seen. It only affects the initialization and cleanup. Not the replace-update problem.

Final word #2: please note that there are also the references. If the modules B/C captured the Base* or the shared_ptr<Base> by reference, then there would be no point in introducing the Base** or shared_ptr<shared_ptr<Base>>.. The capture-by-reference would already introduce the same one-more-level-of-indirection that was required. In fact, a reference & is internally just a raw pointer, so &-to-Base* is in fact Base**.

Final word #3:

I've already said it, but let me repeat.. The core problem is that shared_ptr is 'shared' in terms of the reference counting, not the data. Thus:

shared_ptr<Foo> first = new Foo(1);
shared_ptr<Foo> second = first;
shared_ptr<Foo> third = second;

// now first == Foo#1   \
// now second == Foo#1  | refcount = 3
// now third == Foo#1   /

third.reset( new Bar(2) );

// now first == Foo#1   \ refcount = 2
// now second == Foo#1  /
// now third == Bar#2   - refcount = 1

second.reset( new Asdf(3) );

// now first == Foo#1   - refcount = 1
// now second == Asdf#3 - refcount = 1
// now third == Bar#2   - refcount = 1

first.reset( third );

// now first == Bar#2                   \
// now second == Asdf#3 - refcount = 1  | - refcount = 2
// now third == Bar#2                   /
// and Foo#1 gets deleted
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So basically the question is, I have Foo* fooptr. I put fooptr in some containers. Then I figure out fooptr should be Bar*. How to change fooptr to Bar* for all containers? –  Superspr May 15 '13 at 8:06
    
Here's an exact duplicate of you question, but much better described: stackoverflow.com/questions/11310636/… Please be a little more specific next time. Those three lines of code told me more than all your text - mostly because you said quite a strange things about "casting My_Object". –  quetzalcoatl May 15 '13 at 9:38
    
I think your answer is better explained than in the duplicate. One additional point, obj_array doesn't have to be a vector of pointer to pointer. It can simply be a vector<shared_ptr<Base>>. Please correct me if I'm wrong. Thanks. –  Superspr May 15 '13 at 21:35
    
Please reread my answer. Instead of futilely asking you for "moar detailz", I've simply bloated it with explanation of different options and consequences. –  quetzalcoatl May 16 '13 at 9:26
    
Thanks for the examples. Great effort. –  Superspr May 16 '13 at 22:17

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