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I needed to be able to load a particular page in an iframe on demand, so I used a simple wrapper:

function updateFrame(url) {
    frames[0].location = url;
}

Then I was asked to load the page to a particular point, which was non-trivial, since the pages were not within my control and there weren't always <a name> anchors to rely on. So some poking around showed that IDs could be used as anchors.

That is to say, you can scroll to <div id = "somewhere-down-the-line"> with:

updateFrame("http://host/page#somewhere-down-the-line");

except this call also scrolls the entire viewport up so that the above <div> goes to the top and everything in the parent page above it scrolls out of view.

How do I modify updateFrame(url) so that it scrolls the page within the <iframe> but leaves the rest of the page as it is?

This hack worked for me on Firefox 20.0.1/Windows. Essentially, I load the page first, then jump to the target:

function updateFrame(url) {
    if (url.indexOf('#') > -1) {
        mainPage = url.split('#')[0];
        frames[0].location = mainPage;
    }
    frames[0].location = url;
}

I would like to be able to use this in other browsers as well. I have been trying to get it to work in Chrome. Maybe I'll even try Internet Explorer...

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Also, I was wondering since when the IDs became valid anchors. Can't seem to find the W3C recommendation that changed this. –  icedwater May 15 '13 at 8:21
    
Is the iframe on the same domain, or could it be a different domain? –  Jordan Gray Jul 25 '13 at 13:11
    
It could be on a different domain. Does that make a difference? I know about CSRF and security measures, but I'm not sure how this may affect the scrolling / refreshing behaviour. –  icedwater Jul 26 '13 at 1:30
    
It doesn't stop scrolling from working, but it does rule out a few ideas I had. The best candidate so far is a nasty hack. –  Jordan Gray Jul 26 '13 at 8:06
    
@JordanGray I've even used <meta http-equiv = "refresh" content = "0;site#marker"> in an interstitial, but that didn't help matters. –  icedwater Jul 26 '13 at 8:11

3 Answers 3

If a hack is ok, and what you're looking for is cross-browser try using scrollTop to reset where you were.

E.g. if it is the body that scrolls

function updateFrame(url) {
    //save where you were
    var oldScroll = document.body.scrollTop;

    //this moves our body!
    frames[0].location = url;

    //move it back
    document.body.scrollTop = oldScroll;
}

Of course if it doesn't actually scrolls the entire viewport and instead modifies a parent div or something, the scrollTop property will be on that element too.

Let me know if this works, but screws up the scrolling on the frame, because I can modify this to account for a difference between the two scrollTops

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll test it soon. –  icedwater Jul 22 '13 at 1:10
    
The scrollTop property is correctly identified and shows up in console.log, but setting it has no visible effect. The top of the iframe still remains at the top of the page. –  icedwater Jul 22 '13 at 7:04
    
However, setting scrollTop outside the function has the desired effect of sending the page back to the top. I'll +1 for reminding me of scrollTop, but this didn't solve the problem the way I wanted it to. –  icedwater Jul 22 '13 at 7:07
1  
I probably misunderstood. And there's no way a fiddle would be feasible, so thanks for the +1, I tried :) –  Hashbrown Jul 22 '13 at 7:49
1  
use parent.document.body.scrollTop then, its possible the code is executing in the frame's window, not the one we want –  Hashbrown Jul 24 '13 at 13:01

You could try turning the bolts yourself by detecting the height of the element you want, and forcing the scrollTop of the frame.

function updateFrame(url) {
    //get the parts
    var parts = url.split('#');
    //go to the url
    frames[0].location = parts[0];

    //if there was an anchor
    var anchor;
    if (parts.length > 0 && parts[1].length > 0) {
        //may want to account for a[name="PARTS[1]"] too
        anchor = frames[0].document.getElementById(parts[1]);

        //set the scroll of it yourself, using some sort of library to get "fullTop"
        frames[0].document.body.scrollTop = anchor.fullTop();
    }
}

Where "fullTop" is equivalent to the distance between the top of the iframe, and the element.
Like jQuery's .offset() or YUI's getXY(el).[1]

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

What worked for me on Firefox 20.0.1/Windows. Essentially, I load the page first, then jump to the target:

function updateFrame(url) {
    if (url.indexOf('#') > -1) {
        mainPage = url.split('#')[0];
        frames[0].location = mainPage;
    }
    frames[0].location = url;
}

On Chrome 28.0/Windows, calling updateFrame(url) followed by setting document.body.scrollTop = 0 (thanks to this answer) had the desired effect, though only in the console. I am still testing on other browsers; a more elegant solution is always appreciated :)

As mentioned in the question, though, I would like to be able to use this in other browsers as well. Maybe I'll even try Internet Explorer...

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